Permaculture companion plants for Squash

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Image Name Data Description Actions
Corn Corn
2-11
Annual
Full sun
Moist
Light (sandy), Medium, Heavy (clay)
2
true
Pollen, Seed, Stem
Fast
Maize, corn, abado, able, aburow, agbado, awasi, awi, bara-jowar, bhutta, blefo, bli, buta, chujak, goinjol, gomdhan, igbado, jagung, janar, jonar, junri, kaaba, keto, kolkoti, kon, kono, kukri, maka, makai, makka jonnalu, makka-cholam, makka, makkai, makkari, makoi, masara agwado, massara, mekkejola, milho, mokka-janna, musukojola, naham, nyo, oka, oksusu, shaa, sil ni vavalagi, ta-mank, yu shu shu, ai, amylum maydis, awási, aya, corn oi, 6 corn oil (unhydrogenated), corn silk, corn starch, corn syrup solids, corn|iringu, dent corn, dura shami, field corn, flint corn, gangnaengi, granoturco, indian corn, maidis stigma, mais, maiz, aceite, maize oil, refined, maize starch, majs, maydis amylum, maydis oleum raffinatum, maydis stigma, maíz, aceite refinado, maîs, maïs, ogsusu, oleum maydis, pelos de elafe, pod corn, popcorn, refined maize oil, risoy genime sami, stigmata maidis, styli cum stigmatis zeae maydis, sweet corn, topical starch, to-morokoshi, yu mi shu, yu mi xu, zein, zorrat
Poaceae or gramineae
Mais
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maize
Oil
https://pfaf.org/User/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Zea mays
Corn (Zea mays) is a plant native to Central America and Mexico. It is a tall plant with a sturdy stem and large leaves that grow in a spiral pattern around the stem. The plant produces large, brightly colored flowers that give way to ears of corn. The ears are typically yellow, but can also be white, red, or blue. Corn grows to be anywhere from 3-12 feet tall and can grow quickly, depending on the variety. To differentiate corn from similar plants, gardeners and farmers can look for the spiral pattern of the leaves and the presence of ears. Corn is often grown in rows, which can also help to distinguish it from other plants. Corn prefers well-draining, fertile soil and full sun. In order to cultivate it successfully, a grower will need to provide these conditions and also ensure that the plants receive adequate water. Corn is often grown from seed, which should be planted in the ground when the soil has warmed to at least 60 degrees Fahrenheit. Corn is edible, and the edible parts are the kernels that are found on the ears. The ears can be harvested when the kernels are plump and fully developed. They can be stored after harvest by drying them in the sun or by freezing them. Corn has many uses. In addition to being a popular food crop, it can also be used as livestock feed and as a source of biofuel. It can also be used as a building material and for crafting. Corn has medicinal properties and has been used to treat a variety of ailments. It is also valued by wildlife, as it provides food and shelter for birds, small mammals, and insects. Show

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Marjoram Marjoram
6-9
Perennial
Full sun, Partial sun/shade
Dry, Moist
Light (sandy), Medium, Heavy (clay)
0.6
Herbs
true
Leaves
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marjoram
Lamiaceae or labiatae
Majoran
https://pfaf.org/User/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Origanum majorana
Marjoram (Origanum majorana) is a herbaceous plant that is native to the Mediterranean region. It has delicate, oval-shaped leaves that are pale green in color, and small white or pink flowers that grow in clusters. The plant grows to a height of about 30 cm and has a woody stem. In terms of growing conditions, marjoram prefers well-drained, light soil and full sun to partial shade. It can be grown from seeds or cuttings, and should be spaced about 30 cm apart. Marjoram is winter hardy in mild climates, but may need to be protected or brought indoors in colder regions. Marjoram has a number of culinary uses. It is often used as a flavoring in soups, stews, and sauces, and can be added to salads and other dishes as a garnish. The leaves and flowers of the plant are edible and can be used fresh or dried. When harvesting marjoram, it is best to pick the leaves early in the morning when they are at their most flavorful. The leaves can be stored in an airtight container in a cool, dark place for up to six months. In addition to its culinary uses, marjoram has also been used medicinally as an antiseptic and as a remedy for digestive problems. It is also sometimes used in perfumes and soaps. Marjoram is not particularly attractive to wildlife, but it can provide habitat for some beneficial insects such as bees and butterflies. Show

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Borage Borage
6-9
Annual
Full sun, Partial sun/shade
Dry, Moist
Light (sandy), Medium, Heavy (clay)
0.6
Herbs
Flowers, Leaves
Seed - direct sow
At last frost
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Borage
Medium
Common borage, Cool-tankard, Tailwort, Starflower
Boraginaceae
Borretsch
60cm
5-15 days
21°c (70°f)
Oil
https://pfaf.org/User/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Borago officinalis
Borago
5
-2
Borage, also known as Borago officinalis, is a herb native to the Mediterranean region. It is a hairy, annual herb that grows to a height of about 60 cm, with blue, star-shaped flowers and large hairy leaves. The plant is easily differentiated from similar plants by its hairy stems and leaves, and its bright blue flowers. Borage prefers well-drained soil and full sun, and grows best in warm temperatures. It is a fast-growing plant, and can be easily cultivated by direct sowing or transplanting seedlings. Borage is not winter hardy, and should be grown as an annual in most climates. The leaves and flowers of borage are edible, and can be used in salads, soups, and other dishes. The leaves have a cucumber-like flavor, while the flowers are slightly sweet. The edible parts of the plant can be stored by freezing or drying. Borage has several medicinal uses, and has been used traditionally to treat a variety of ailments, including respiratory problems, skin irritation, and anxiety. It is also a good source of nutrients, including calcium, potassium, and vitamin C. In addition to its medicinal uses, borage has value as a companion plant in the garden. It attracts pollinators, such as bees and butterflies, and can be used as a natural pest deterrent. #### Propagation Direct sow early spring when temperatures reach 21°C (70°F). Best sown directly, as borage develops a delicate taproot. #### Links [Borage @ West Coast Seeds](https://www.westcoastseeds.com/products/borage) Show

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Maximilian Sunflower Maximilian Sunflower
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Helianthus_maximiliani
true
Medium
Moist
Full sun
4-10
Maximillian daisy
Light (sandy), Medium, Heavy (clay)
Asteraceae or compositae
2.4
Root
Perennial
#### Links [Maximilian Sunflower @ Plants For A Future](https://pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Helianthus maximilianii) Show

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Common Sunflower Common Sunflower
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Helianthus_annuus
true
Fast
Dry, Moist
Full sun, Partial sun/shade
6-9
Common sunflower
Light (sandy), Medium, Heavy (clay)
Asteraceae or compositae
3.0
Flowers, Seed, Stem
Oil
Weed potential
Annual
https://pfaf.org/User/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Helianthus annuus
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Tansy Tansy
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tansy
true
Fast
Dry, Moist
Full sun
3-8
Common tansy, golden buttons, curly leaf tansy
Light (sandy), Medium, Heavy (clay)
Asteraceae or compositae
1.0
Rainfarn
Herbs
Flowers, Leaves
Weed potential
Perennial
https://pfaf.org/User/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Tanacetum vulgare
0.2
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Okra Okra
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Okra
true
Moist
Full sun
5-11
A-koto, angu, apala, asowntem, bakhua-mun, bamia, bandakka, bendi, bhindee, bhindi, binda, bindi, bondo, cantarela, derere rechipudzi, derere, dheras, dherosh, enmomi, fetri, gombaut, gombo, gumbo, guro, gusha, hakuyot, idelele, ikhievbo, ilasha, ilo, ka fei huang kui, kacang bendi, kaganh lender, kandia, kandjie, kopi arab, krachiap-mon, kubewa, lafeu, lieka, loka, maana, ma-lontho, mesta, muomi, miagorro, nathando, nkruma, obori, ochro, okworu, okwulu, otigo-iwoka, pahari bendi, pingpesi, poot barang, pui, quiabo, quimbambo, saluyot a bunga, sayur bendi, taku, uisul hme, vandakai, vandikkai, vendal, wayika, you-padi
Light (sandy), Medium, Heavy (clay)
Malvaceae
1.0
Herbs
Fruit, Leaves, Root, Seed
Oil
Weed potential
Annual, Perennial
https://pfaf.org/User/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Abelmoschus esculentus
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Common bean Common bean
2-11
Annual
Full sun
Moist
Light (sandy), Medium, Heavy (clay)
2.0
Vines
Nitrogen fixer
True
Leaves, Seed, Seedpod
Seed - transplant, Seed - direct sow
1 week after last frost, 12-14 weeks before first frost
2-4 weeks before last frost
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phaseolus_vulgaris
Pole bean, Climbing bean, French bean, Bush bean, Dwarf bean, Kidney bean, Green bean
Fabaceae, Leguminosae
Stangenbohne
https://pfaf.org/User/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Phaseolus vulgaris
16-18°c (70-80°f)
6.0-6.8
2.5 cm
16cm
4-10 days
45-85
Fast
Sperzieboon
This entry describes all varieties of the common bean. This includes vining and bush/darf variaties and can have different names depending on their style of growths (see alternate names). These include the kidney bean, the navy bean, the pinto bean, the French bean and the wax bean The common bean, scientific name Phaseolus vulgaris, is a herbaceous annual plant native to the Americas, specifically the regions extending from the southwestern United States to South America. It is a member of the Fabaceae (legume) family. The common bean has a range of different appearances, depending on the variety. Most varieties have a simple, erect stem that grows to a height of 20-60 cm. The leaves are typically green and consist of 3-5 oblong leaflets. The flowers are small and white, pink, or purple in color. The fruit is a legume, which contains the seeds. The common bean is typically a small plant, but some varieties can grow to be quite large, reaching heights of up to 2 meters. The plant grows relatively quickly, with the growing season typically lasting between 60-100 days. The common bean prefers well-drained soil and full sun, but can also grow in partial shade. It is sensitive to frost and should be planted after the last frost date in the spring. To cultivate the common bean successfully, a grower may need to ensure that the soil is adequately fertilized and provide support for the plant to climb, if necessary. The common bean is edible, with the seeds and the young pods being the most commonly consumed parts. The seeds can be cooked and eaten as a protein-rich vegetable, and the young pods can be eaten as a green vegetable. The edible parts can be stored after harvest by drying the seeds or by preserving the young pods in vinegar or oil. The common bean has many uses beyond being a food source. The plant can fix nitrogen in the soil, improving its fertility and making it a useful companion plant for other crops. The dried leaves and stems of the common bean can be used as mulch or as a source of organic matter. In some cultures, the fibers from the stems are used to make ropes or other weaving materials. Additionally, the plant has been used medicinally to treat a variety of ailments. The common bean is also valuable for wildlife. The flowers attract bees and other pollinators, and the plant provides food for a variety of insects, birds, and small mammals. ### Links [Beans Seed Starting Tips @ Harvest to Table](https://harvesttotable.com/beans-seed-starting-tips/) ### Propagation - direct sow Direct-sow beans in spring after all danger of frost has passed and soil is at least 16°C (60°F). In warm-winter regions, sow beans in late summer for harvest in winter. Time sowing so that beans come to harvest before the first frost. Show

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Runner Bean Runner Bean
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phaseolus_coccineus
true
Fast
Moist
Full sun
1-12
Scarlet runner, scarlet runner bean, scarlet conqueror, fire bean, mammoth, red giant phaseolus coccineus ssppolyanthus (cache bean)
Light (sandy), Medium, Heavy (clay)
Fabaceae or leguminosae
3.0
Flowers, Leaves, Root, Seed, Seedpod
Annual, Perennial
https://pfaf.org/User/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Phaseolus coccineus
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Broad Bean Broad Bean
4-8
Annual
Full sun, Partial sun/shade
Moist
Light (sandy), Medium, Heavy (clay)
1.0
Nitrogen fixer
Leaves, Seed
Seed - direct sow, Seed - transplant
6 weeks after sowing them in pots
6 weeks after sowing them in pots
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vicia_faba
Fast
fava bean, faba bean, Broad bean, or faba bean Varieties with smaller, harder seeds that are fed to horses or other animals are called field bean, tic bean or tick bean Horse bean
Fabaceae or Leguminosae
Ackerbohne
https://pfaf.org/User/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Vicia faba major
20cm
Feb-April; Oct-Nov
21 days
sow in deep pots in cool, frost-free place
6.0-6.8
Broad bean (Vicia faba), also known as fava bean or faba bean, is a type of legume that is native to North Africa and the Middle East. It is a popular garden plant, known for its edible beans and attractive purple or white flowers. Broad bean plants have a upright, bushy growth habit and can reach a height of up to 3 feet. The leaves are large and composed of three oval-shaped leaflets, and the flowers are small and clustered in groups of two or three. The beans are produced in long, slender pods that contain two or three beans each. To grow broad beans successfully, it is important to choose a location with well-drained, fertile soil and full sun. The plants should be spaced about 8-12 inches apart, and watered regularly to ensure that the soil stays moist but not waterlogged. Broad beans are generally easy to grow and require little maintenance, but they can be susceptible to pests and diseases, such as aphids and fungal infections. Grows best in temperatures ranging from 60° to 65°F (15-18°C) but will tolerate a range from 40°F (4.4°C) - 75°F (24°C). Broad beans are edible, and the beans can be eaten fresh or frozen, canned or dried for storage. To harvest the beans, the pods should be picked when they are plump and before the beans inside begin to harden. The beans can be removed from the pods by gently squeezing them out. Fresh beans can be stored in the refrigerator for a few days, while dried beans can be stored in an airtight container for several months. In addition to their culinary uses, broad beans also have a number of medicinal properties, and have been used to treat a variety of ailments, including asthma, bronchitis, and anemia. Broad beans are also a valuable food source for many types of wildlife, including birds, insects, and small mammals. The plants provide nectar for bees and other pollinators, and the beans are a popular food for many species of birds. Show

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Radish Radish
2-11
Annual
Full sun, Partial sun/shade
Moist
Light (sandy), Medium, Heavy (clay)
0.5
Roots
true
Flowers, Leaves, Root, Seed, Seedpod
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Radish
Fast
Cultivated radish
Brassicaceae or cruciferae
Rettich
Oil
Weed potential
https://pfaf.org/User/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Raphanus sativus
The radish, also known as Raphanus sativus, is a plant native to southwestern Asia and the eastern Mediterranean region. It is a cool-season annual that grows quickly, often maturing in just a few weeks. The radish has a distinctive round or oblong shape, with a crisp and juicy texture. Its skin is typically red or white, but can also be purple, yellow, or black. The leaves of the radish are elongated and dark green in color, while its flowers are small and white or yellow in color. Radishes are relatively small, typically growing to be about four inches long and two inches wide. They prefer well-drained soil that is high in organic matter, and can be grown in a variety of climates, including temperate and subtropical regions. Radishes are typically differentiated from similar plants, such as turnips, by their smaller size and more pungent flavor. They can be harvested at any stage of their growth, but are typically harvested when they are young and tender for the best flavor. To cultivate radishes successfully, a grower will need to plant them in well-prepared soil, water them regularly, and thin out the plants to prevent overcrowding. Radishes are generally hardy and can tolerate frost, making them a good choice for a fall or winter garden. The edible parts of the radish plant are the root and the leaves. The root can be eaten raw, cooked, or pickled, while the leaves can be used in salads or cooked like other leafy greens. After harvest, the roots can be stored in a cool and dark place, such as a root cellar, to prolong their shelf life. Radishes have a number of uses, both in the garden and beyond. In the garden, they can be used as a companion plant to deter pests and improve the health of other plants. In addition to their use in cooking, radishes have also been used medicinally, with some evidence suggesting that they may have anti-inflammatory and digestive health benefits. Radishes are also a valuable food source for wildlife, providing a source of nutrition for birds and small mammals. They are a popular food for bees and other pollinators, and can help to attract these beneficial insects to the garden. Show

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Pot marigold Pot marigold
2-11
Annual
Full sun, Partial sun/shade
Moist
Light (sandy), Medium, Heavy (clay)
0.6
Repels nematodes
Flowers, Leaves, Seed
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Calendula_officinalis
Medium
Calendula, Common marigold, Scotch marigold, Ruddles
Asteraceae or compositae
Ringelblume
https://pfaf.org/User/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Calendula officinalis
21°c (70°f)
6-14 days
5.5-7.0
15cm
60
4.6
The pot marigold, also known as Calendula officinalis, is a flowering plant probably native to southwestern Asia, western Europe, and the Mediterranean region, however, its long cultivation history makes its precise origin unknown. It is a herbaceous annual plant that typically grows to be about 12-18 inches tall, with hairy stems and leaves. The leaves are lance-shaped, with a hairy surface, and the flowers can range in colour from white through yellow and orange to red and even pink. In terms of growing conditions, the pot marigold prefers well-drained soil and full sun, although it can tolerate partial shade. It is winter hardy, but may not flower as profusely in colder climates. To cultivate it successfully, a grower should plant pot marigold seeds directly in the ground after the last frost of the season. The pot marigold has a number of uses, both culinary and medicinal. The flowers are edible and can be used to add color and flavor to salads and other dishes. The petals can also be dried and used to make tea. In terms of medicinal uses, the plant has been used for centuries to treat a variety of ailments, including wounds, infections, and skin irritation. The pot marigold is also attractive to a variety of pollinators, making it a valuable plant for attracting beneficial insects to the garden. Overall, the pot marigold is a versatile and easy-to-grow plant that is well-suited to a variety of garden settings. ### Propagation - Direct sow Direct sow in spring when light frost is still possible. Can be sown until early summer for fall blooms. ### Propagation - Transplant Sow indoors in late winter, transplant outside when risk of heavy frost has passed. #### Links [Calendula @ West Coast Seeds](https://www.westcoastseeds.com/products/zeolights-organic) Show

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Buckwheat Buckwheat
6-12
Annual
Full sun
Dry, Moist
Light (sandy), Medium, Heavy (clay)
1.5
true
Leaves, Seed
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buckwheat
Fast
Brank, buchweizen, chutia lofa, daran, dayat, dhemsi sak, doron, fagopiro, grano saraceno, kotu, kyoubaku, memil, notch-seeded buckwheat, obul, oogal, phaphar, phaphara, phaphra, qiao mai, saracen, sarrasin, soba, tian qiao mai, titaphapur, trigo-sarraceno, alforfón, blé noir, bouquette, bovete, buchweizen, buckwheat, buckwheat herb, common buckwheat, echter buchweizen, faggina, fagopiro, fagopyri herba, fagopyrum, fagopyrum esculentum, grano saraceno, grano saroceno, grano sarraceno, grano turco, grecicha kul'turnaja, grecicha posevnaja, heidekorn, japanese buckwheat, memil, qiao mai, renouée, sa, sarasin, sarrasin, serrasin
Polygonaceae
Echter buchweizen
https://pfaf.org/User/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Fagopyrum esculentum
Buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum) is a type of flowering plant that is native to the Himalayas and other parts of Asia. It belongs to the family Polygonaceae, which includes around 120 species of plants. Buckwheat is a popular crop, known for its triangular, reddish-brown seeds, which are used to make flour and other products. The plant has a bushy growth habit and can reach a height of up to 2-3 feet. The leaves are green, heart-shaped, and have a waxy texture, and the flowers are small and white or pink in color. To grow buckwheat successfully, it is important to choose a location with well-drained, fertile soil and full sun. The plant is tolerant of a wide range of soil conditions, but prefers moist, slightly acidic soil. Buckwheat can also be grown in containers, and will benefit from regular fertilization. The plant is relatively easy to grow and requires little maintenance, but can be susceptible to pests and diseases, such as aphids and rust. Buckwheat is a valuable source of protein and other nutrients, and is used in a variety of dishes, including pancakes, noodles, and porridge. The seeds can also be sprouted and added to salads and other dishes. In addition to its culinary uses, buckwheat has a number of medicinal properties, and has been used to treat a variety of ailments, including asthma, allergies, and skin Show

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