Global garden feed

Multiplier onions are a win! Bought these after learning about them from SkillCult. Did not disappoint. Started from sets 2 months ago. Harvested sustainably for gronions as they grew, and each single set tripled or quadrupled.

Anyone else growing multipliers / potato onions?

Multiplier onions are a win! Bought these after learning about them from SkillCult. Did not disappoint.
Started from sets 2 months ago. Harvested sustainably for gronions as they grew, and each single set tripled or quadrupled. 

Anyone else growing multipliers / potato onions?

Plants

Ground cherries — both volunteers from last year’s leftovers — and some seeds planted around my new persimmon trees are sprouting this week. Some with 4-5 leaves. They needed warmer soil and rain. None of my inside starts worked well enough to plant. Direct sowing next year.

In addition, squash that were direct sown are already larger than transplants that had a 3 week head start.

Cucumbers and melons that were direct seeded are coming up with the heat and rain, but we will see if they overtake the stunted transplants. Next year I should direct sow with little plastic domes to heat the soil.

Plants

Strawberry spinach is one or the most interesting and fun surprises we’re growing. It’s a perennial, has edible leaves (taste just like spinach) and edible fruity flower bud things… The “strawberries” even have a slight sweetness to them. Started last spring from seed, planted out last summer and it grew quite a lot. This spring it was the first of the greens to pop, and has been delivering for 2 months already. Will be eating the fruits in salad for the rest of the summer. Hopefully it comes back! Will save some seed just in case.

Strawberry spinach is one or the most interesting and fun surprises we’re growing.
It’s a perennial, has edible leaves (taste just like spinach) and edible fruity flower bud things…
The “strawberries” even have a slight sweetness to them. 
Started last spring from seed, planted out last summer and it grew quite a lot. This spring it was the first of the greens to pop, and has been delivering for 2 months already. Will be eating the fruits in salad for the rest of the summer. Hopefully it comes back! Will save some seed just in case. Strawberry spinach is one or the most interesting and fun surprises we’re growing.
It’s a perennial, has edible leaves (taste just like spinach) and edible fruity flower bud things…
The “strawberries” even have a slight sweetness to them. 
Started last spring from seed, planted out last summer and it grew quite a lot. This spring it was the first of the greens to pop, and has been delivering for 2 months already. Will be eating the fruits in salad for the rest of the summer. Hopefully it comes back! Will save some seed just in case.

Plants

Herb garden taking off after some solid rain this past week. Mostly volunteers and returning perennials. There were a few things here when we lived in, but I expanded the garden to consume all the single plantings and filled every in between. The goal is to have this garden as low maintenance as possible.

Herb garden taking off after some solid rain this past week. Mostly volunteers and returning perennials. There were a few things here when we lived in, but I expanded the garden to consume all the single plantings and filled every in between. The goal is to have this garden as low maintenance as possible.

Plants

Persimmon buds are finally breaking! My patience was wearing thin, but these bad boys are going to leaf out after all!

In order to cover the soil and support these trees, I planted a number of seeds; green beans, dill, snapdragons, squash, mustard, and ground cherry. May the most vigorous win, and the rest feed the soil!

Will likely underplant with something more permanent in the future.

Persimmon buds are finally breaking! My patience was wearing thin, but these bad boys are going to leaf out after all! 

In order to cover the soil and support these trees, I planted a number of seeds; green beans, dill, snapdragons, squash, mustard, and ground cherry. May the most vigorous win, and the rest feed the soil!

Will likely underplant with something more permanent in the future. Persimmon buds are finally breaking! My patience was wearing thin, but these bad boys are going to leaf out after all! 

In order to cover the soil and support these trees, I planted a number of seeds; green beans, dill, snapdragons, squash, mustard, and ground cherry. May the most vigorous win, and the rest feed the soil!

Will likely underplant with something more permanent in the future.

Plants

Chocolate trees, I’m not so much growing them as slowly killing them, but they’re still alive and I have high hopes.

On the left is an Inga feuillei (Ice Cream Bean). It’s very happy, growing lots of little shoots and a few big ones. I bet it would make adventitious roots, eh? Quick and easy propagation if so…

I enclosed a metal shelving unit with greenhouse plastic, put a heater on the bottom with fish tank full of water and a towel hanging down into it to make a simple swamp cooler to modulate the heater and increase the humidity. It worked really well until the towel dissolved!

Chocolate trees, I'm not so much growing them as slowly killing them, but they're still alive and I have high hopes.

On the left is an Inga feuillei (Ice Cream Bean).  It's very happy, growing lots of little shoots and a few big ones.  I bet it would make adventitious roots, eh?  Quick and easy propagation if so...

I enclosed a metal shelving unit with greenhouse plastic, put a heater on the bottom with fish tank full of water and a towel hanging down into it to make a simple swamp cooler to modulate the heater and increase the humidity.  It worked really well until the towel dissolved! Chocolate trees, I'm not so much growing them as slowly killing them, but they're still alive and I have high hopes.

On the left is an Inga feuillei (Ice Cream Bean).  It's very happy, growing lots of little shoots and a few big ones.  I bet it would make adventitious roots, eh?  Quick and easy propagation if so...

I enclosed a metal shelving unit with greenhouse plastic, put a heater on the bottom with fish tank full of water and a towel hanging down into it to make a simple swamp cooler to modulate the heater and increase the humidity.  It worked really well until the towel dissolved!

Plants

Finally getting started this year, very late. Bought 2x Jasmine and 2x pink chrysanthemums at the market yesterday. Already have 1x bay, 1x rosemary, 1x mint to add to the raised bed. Helping hands arrive tomorrow. :-)

Have you ever seen such a kale? It’s a kale/collard cross that has been grown in San Francisco for several generations (of kale, not humans.) The seeds for this tree were originally given to me by one Kevin Bayuk, currently of LIFT Economy (https://www.lifteconomy.com/) who called them “perennial brassica crosses” and they live up to the name. This tree was planted about two-and-a-half years ago. There are some others around the corner but they have a bushy habit. This one is clearly expressing some Walking Stick kale genes or something, eh?

I’m pretty sure Park Merced will come in and remove all of this once we leave. The landscapers themselves are cool, but mgmt wants the place to look like LEGO land. It’s a race against time for those seed pods to ripen before they tree gets the ax.

Anyway, life goes on. I’ve given away seeds from previous generations and there are lots of little plants here and there. If you look closely at the lower left corner you can just see the edges of the leaves of another one, it has purple stems! Same seeds.

A lot of other stuff going on in this photo. From left to right on the ground there is a bunch of safflower that are just there from bird seed I tossed out. Ground cover and mulch, yeah? They are doing really well.

(The little bush with the red leaves is Park Merced’s, I don’t know what it is but it’s tough.)

Then there are a few Sweet Lorane fava beans, fourth generation here. They have adapted well. Bugs eat the leaves but they don’t care, they just outgrow all damage.

Then there’s that tree (the tree-tree not the kale-tree), you can see it has been maintained with great expertise, by a doctor. Dr. Seuss.

At the base of the tree we have a wild pile of all kinds of things, a few I planted but mostly wild stuff I collected from nearby.

You can see the fuzzy tufted heads of the bunny tail grass (Lagurus ovatus), that’s the second year it’s grown from that spot. Perennial, eh? The little purple flowers are (I’m pretty sure) Little-Robin (Geranium purpureum). You can see another brassica cross in there, as well as some random wild plants with oval leaves. There’s a carrot in there bolting, I think it’s Pusa Asita (“Tropical Black”) but we’ll see. Same thing as the kale: race against time to ripen the seeds before the landscapers make it “nice” again.

Last but not least, there’s a nice big dandelion, because I like dandelions.

On the right there’s a Monkey Grass (Liriope) I found in the dumpster. It would be happier if I buried it deeper but at least it’s not in the dumpster.

The strawberries on the ground are beach strawberry (Fragaria chiloensis) from around Lake Merced. They send runners out aggressively and make a thick ground cover. They flower but rarely make berries. If the landscapers don’t remove it completely it will eventually cover the whole area.

Whew! So that’s what’s happening in that picture. This is about half of all the space I have (had) at our old place, and technically I wasn’t supposed to use it at all. I’ve been pent up people, is what I’m saying.

That bit of grass in the back against the wall: panic veldtgrass (Ehrharta erecta). “Native to Southern Africa and Yemen” it’s a beast here. It continuously goes to seed, the seeds are tiny and numerous, it spreads also by runners, etc. I thought it was indestructible until I saw what chickens do to it. I’ll post a picture later of a plant that grew on our concrete stair case! It started with a bit of schmutz and just didn’t die and now it’s the size of a basketball. It’s literally growing on concrete.

Have you ever seen such a kale?  It's a kale/collard cross that has been
grown in San Francisco for several generations (of kale, not humans.)
The seeds for this tree were originally given to me by one Kevin Bayuk,
currently of LIFT Economy (https://www.lifteconomy.com/) who called them
"perennial brassica crosses" and they live up to the name.  This tree was
planted about two-and-a-half years ago.  There are some others around the
corner but they have a bushy habit.  This one is clearly expressing some
Walking Stick kale genes or something, eh?

I'm pretty sure Park Merced will come in and remove all of this once we
leave.  The landscapers themselves are cool, but mgmt wants the place to
look like LEGO land.  It's a race against time for those seed pods to
ripen before they tree gets the ax.

Anyway, life goes on.  I've given away seeds from previous generations
and there are lots of little plants here and there.  If you look closely
at the lower left corner you can just see the edges of the leaves of
another one, it has purple stems!  Same seeds.

A lot of other stuff going on in this photo.  From left to right on the
ground there is a bunch of safflower that are just there from bird seed I
tossed out.  Ground cover and mulch, yeah?  They are doing really well.

(The little bush with the red leaves is Park Merced's, I don't know what
it is but it's tough.)

Then there are a few Sweet Lorane fava beans, fourth generation here.
They have adapted well.  Bugs eat the leaves but they don't care, they
just outgrow all damage.

Then there's that tree (the tree-tree not the kale-tree), you can see it
has been maintained with great expertise, by a doctor.  Dr. Seuss.

At the base of the tree we have a wild pile of all kinds of things, a few
I planted but mostly wild stuff I collected from nearby.

You can see the fuzzy tufted heads of the bunny tail grass (Lagurus
ovatus), that's the second year it's grown from that spot.  Perennial,
eh?  The little purple flowers are (I'm pretty sure) Little-Robin
(Geranium purpureum).  You can see another brassica cross in there, as
well as some random wild plants with oval leaves.  There's a carrot in
there bolting, I think it's Pusa Asita ("Tropical Black") but we'll see.
Same thing as the kale: race against time to ripen the seeds before the
landscapers make it "nice" again.

Last but not least, there's a nice big dandelion, because I like
dandelions.

On the right there's a Monkey Grass (Liriope) I found in the dumpster.
It would be happier if I buried it deeper but at least it's not in the
dumpster.

The strawberries on the ground are beach strawberry (Fragaria chiloensis)
from around Lake Merced.  They send runners out aggressively and make a
thick ground cover.  They flower but rarely make berries.  If the
landscapers don't remove it completely it will eventually cover the whole
area.

Whew!  So that's what's happening in that picture.  This is about half of
all the space I have (had) at our old place, and technically I wasn't
supposed to use it at all.  I've been pent up people, is what I'm saying.


That bit of grass in the back against the wall:
panic veldtgrass (Ehrharta erecta).  "Native to Southern Africa and
Yemen" it's a beast here.  It continuously goes to seed, the seeds are
tiny and numerous, it spreads also by runners, etc.  I thought it was
indestructible until I saw what chickens do to it.  I'll post a picture
later of a plant that grew on our concrete stair case!  It started with a
bit of schmutz and just didn't die and now it's the size of a basketball.
It's literally growing on concrete.

Plants

There’s a lot going on in this photo, let’s break it down. This is the temporary brooder set up in a corner of my room (all cleared out because I’m packing up to go to Green Hills.) You can see it’s divided into two sections. The smaller section on the lower left with the little hillock in it is for the Golden Sebrights, and the larger pen is for the Azure Eggers (you can just see a couple of them over the edge of the plastic tarp.)

In the lower left corner of the image there are three Sebrights napping on the edge of the cardboard box! They like it. I don’t understand how it works, I know there is some special roosting ability in chicken legs, but it’s impressive. I couldn’t nap sitting on a fence.

I put several different roosts along the edge of the brooder: a paper towel tube cut and rolled a little tighter/smaller than normal with a paper towel around it to offer traction; a length of stick; and a wooden paint stirrer (never used on paint, I mixed soil with it.) Still, they like just the edge of cardboard.

In the back in the corner is the box that the eggers sleep in at night, and on the right you can see the prototype of my simple computer system that I’m building. I have since had to cover that up, the eggers started jumping up there. It’s incredible how fast chickens grow. Each day they seem to “level up” and are ready for new things. I can’t wait to get them up to the land and let them run around (inside their respective runs, of course.)

That reminds me, having the two flocks next to each other like this should hopefully let them get used to each other as kids, and curtail inter-flock aggression when they grow up. The Sebrights are about twice as old as the eggers now, but they’re bantam so the eggers are already a little larger, and much heavier. The Sebrights mostly ignore the eggers, who, frankly, are obnoxiously frightened of me and them and everything that isn’t clearly food. Once in awhile one of the eggers will jump up onto the roost and then look around nervously at the Sebrights, who look back like, “Uh-huh, now what?”

There's a lot going on in this photo, let's break it down.  This is the 
temporary brooder set up in a corner of my room (all cleared out because
I'm packing up to go to Green Hills.)  You can see it's divided into two 
sections.  The smaller section on the lower left with the little hillock
in it is for the Golden Sebrights, and the larger pen is for the Azure
Eggers (you can just see a couple of them over the edge of the plastic
tarp.)

In the lower left corner of the image there are three Sebrights napping
on the edge of the cardboard box!  They like it.  I don't understand how 
it works, I know there is some special roosting ability in chicken legs,
but it's impressive.  I couldn't nap sitting on a fence.

I put several different roosts along the edge of the brooder: a paper
towel tube cut and rolled a little tighter/smaller than normal with a
paper towel around it to offer traction; a length of stick; and a wooden
paint stirrer (never used on paint, I mixed soil with it.)  Still, they
like just the edge of cardboard.

In the back in the corner is the box that the eggers sleep in at night,
and on the right you can see the prototype of my simple computer system
that I'm building.  I have since had to cover that up, the eggers started
jumping up there.  It's incredible how fast chickens grow.  Each day they
seem to "level up" and are ready for new things.  I can't wait to get 
them up to the land and let them run around (inside their respective
runs, of course.)

That reminds me, having the two flocks next to each other like this
should hopefully let them get used to each other as kids, and curtail
inter-flock aggression when they grow up.  The Sebrights are about twice
as old as the eggers now, but they're bantam so the eggers are already a
little larger, and much heavier.  The Sebrights mostly ignore the eggers,
who, frankly, are obnoxiously frightened of me and them and everything
that isn't clearly food.  Once in awhile one of the eggers will jump up
onto the roost and then look around nervously at the Sebrights, who look
back like, "Uh-huh, now what?"

A local hatchery had these Golden Sebright chicks coming up for sale. I looked them up and they were so beautiful, so I ordered them w/o really doing much research. It turns out that they have a really interesting history, but they are not a great bird from the point-of-view of farm production. They’re basically a show bird. Too late now, I already love them.

Here they are as lil chicks, and then again at about three weeks. That was a couple of days ago. (I just now realized how to get images from my phone to my computer! So much for being a hotshot computer nerd, eh?)

A local hatchery had these Golden Sebright chicks coming up for sale.  I looked them up and they were so beautiful, so I ordered them w/o really doing much research.  It turns out that they have a really interesting history, but they are not a great bird from the point-of-view of farm production.  They're basically a show bird.  Too late now, I already love them.

Here they are as lil chicks, and then again at about three weeks.  That was a couple of days ago.  (I just now realized how to get images from my phone to my computer!  So much for being a hotshot computer nerd, eh?) A local hatchery had these Golden Sebright chicks coming up for sale.  I looked them up and they were so beautiful, so I ordered them w/o really doing much research.  It turns out that they have a really interesting history, but they are not a great bird from the point-of-view of farm production.  They're basically a show bird.  Too late now, I already love them.

Here they are as lil chicks, and then again at about three weeks.  That was a couple of days ago.  (I just now realized how to get images from my phone to my computer!  So much for being a hotshot computer nerd, eh?)

Let’s see, I got these Macadamia tetraphylla nuts from J.L. Hudson back in May 2021 and planted them in some air-prune mesh bags. Here they are, two years on, having put up with being essentially houseplants. Too dark and too dry and probably too cold. But they’re tough. Now they’re all packed up and ready to go.

I thought I killed that one tree but it has sprouted a new crown of leaves. Whew!

Let's see, I got these Macadamia tetraphylla nuts from J.L. Hudson back in May 2021 and planted them in some air-prune mesh bags.  Here they are, two years on, having put up with being essentially houseplants.  Too dark and too dry and probably too cold.  But they're tough.  Now they're all packed up and ready to go.

I thought I killed that one tree but it has sprouted a new crown of leaves. Whew!

Plants

Planted 244 onions yesterday and today.

From left to right:

4x20 Red Baron, mulched with chipped juniper, grass clippings

4x16 Stuttgarter Riesen, grass clippings

4x20 Sturon, Wood chips from different old stuff, grass clippings

Did not water when planted, instead hoping for rain

Planted 244 onions yesterday and today.

From left to right:

4x20 Red Baron, mulched with chipped juniper, grass clippings

4x16 Stuttgarter Riesen, grass clippings

4x20 Sturon, Wood chips from different old stuff, grass clippings

Did not water when planted, instead hoping for rain

Plants

Planted out melons and cucumbers. Melons: Blacktail watermelon, Minnesota midget, emerald gem, charentais, edisto 47, golden honeydew, noir des carmes.

Cucumbers: Marketmore 76, Bushy, Spacemaster, Blanc de Holland.

The goal for this year is to mass plant the melons into one bed, and hope for crosses (all but the blacktail are cucumis melo) to replant next year.

Cucumbers, not as set on crosses, but the blanc de holland was vigorous and productive last year, whereas the others were slow and many weren’t even fully pollinated. Hoping to save seeds for some improvements.

Planted out melons and cucumbers. 
Melons: 
Blacktail watermelon, Minnesota midget, emerald gem, charentais, edisto 47, golden honeydew, noir des carmes. 

Cucumbers:
Marketmore 76, Bushy, Spacemaster, Blanc de Holland. 

The goal for this year is to mass plant the melons into one bed, and hope for crosses (all but the blacktail are cucumis melo) to replant next year. 

Cucumbers, not as set on crosses, but the blanc de holland was vigorous and productive last year, whereas the others were slow and many weren’t even fully pollinated. Hoping to save seeds for some improvements.

Plants

Cold stratification success! I cracked a couple dozen plum pits and pulled out the seeds last fall, put them in a bread bag w/ moist potting soil, and left them in the cold room all winter. Just went to inspect the stash & noticed the bright white radicles! It’s planting time!

Got a dozen plum seeds planted. There were a few nectarine and peach seeds in there too, but I think only one or two germinated. Time will tell. Mixed a bucket of soil (sandy dirt, some mostly-composted yard waste, last year’s failed potted plant soil & some well aged urine.

Planted into deep nursery trays.

I opted to upgrade my tree trays w/ these deeper ones I got used from a local nursery. They’re maybe 6” deep & have a large hole in the bottom for air pruning the roots. Plums! Hopefully only one of a half dozen tree species I’ll grow this year.

Cold stratification success! I cracked a couple dozen plum pits and pulled out the seeds last fall, put them in a bread bag w/ moist potting soil, and left them in the cold room all winter. Just went to inspect the stash & noticed the bright white radicles! It’s planting time!

Got a dozen plum seeds planted. There were a few nectarine and peach seeds in there too, but I think only one or two germinated. Time will tell. 
Mixed a bucket of soil (sandy dirt, some mostly-composted yard waste, last year’s failed potted plant soil & some well aged urine.

Planted into deep nursery trays.

I opted to upgrade my tree trays w/ these deeper ones I got used from a local nursery. They’re maybe 6” deep & have a large hole in the bottom for air pruning the roots. Plums!
Hopefully only one of a half dozen tree species I’ll grow this year. Cold stratification success! I cracked a couple dozen plum pits and pulled out the seeds last fall, put them in a bread bag w/ moist potting soil, and left them in the cold room all winter. Just went to inspect the stash & noticed the bright white radicles! It’s planting time!

Got a dozen plum seeds planted. There were a few nectarine and peach seeds in there too, but I think only one or two germinated. Time will tell. 
Mixed a bucket of soil (sandy dirt, some mostly-composted yard waste, last year’s failed potted plant soil & some well aged urine.

Planted into deep nursery trays.

I opted to upgrade my tree trays w/ these deeper ones I got used from a local nursery. They’re maybe 6” deep & have a large hole in the bottom for air pruning the roots. Plums!
Hopefully only one of a half dozen tree species I’ll grow this year.

Plants

Raised bed garden updates. There will be a harvest! So far from 6 cucumber plants we’ve been harvesting 1-2 cucumbers per day over the past 2 weeks with more coming so long as blight doesn’t hit! Tomatoes and ground cherries have another few weeks and beans are pumping. Squash has another month at least, with at least (I hope) one squash on each plant.

Raised bed garden updates. There will be a harvest! 
So far from 6 cucumber plants we've been harvesting 1-2 cucumbers per day over the past 2 weeks with more coming so long as blight doesn't hit!
Tomatoes and ground cherries have another few weeks and beans are pumping.
Squash has another month at least, with at least (I hope) one squash on each plant. Raised bed garden updates. There will be a harvest! 
So far from 6 cucumber plants we've been harvesting 1-2 cucumbers per day over the past 2 weeks with more coming so long as blight doesn't hit!
Tomatoes and ground cherries have another few weeks and beans are pumping.
Squash has another month at least, with at least (I hope) one squash on each plant. Raised bed garden updates. There will be a harvest! 
So far from 6 cucumber plants we've been harvesting 1-2 cucumbers per day over the past 2 weeks with more coming so long as blight doesn't hit!
Tomatoes and ground cherries have another few weeks and beans are pumping.
Squash has another month at least, with at least (I hope) one squash on each plant. Raised bed garden updates. There will be a harvest! 
So far from 6 cucumber plants we've been harvesting 1-2 cucumbers per day over the past 2 weeks with more coming so long as blight doesn't hit!
Tomatoes and ground cherries have another few weeks and beans are pumping.
Squash has another month at least, with at least (I hope) one squash on each plant. Raised bed garden updates. There will be a harvest! 
So far from 6 cucumber plants we've been harvesting 1-2 cucumbers per day over the past 2 weeks with more coming so long as blight doesn't hit!
Tomatoes and ground cherries have another few weeks and beans are pumping.
Squash has another month at least, with at least (I hope) one squash on each plant. Raised bed garden updates. There will be a harvest! 
So far from 6 cucumber plants we've been harvesting 1-2 cucumbers per day over the past 2 weeks with more coming so long as blight doesn't hit!
Tomatoes and ground cherries have another few weeks and beans are pumping.
Squash has another month at least, with at least (I hope) one squash on each plant. Raised bed garden updates. There will be a harvest! 
So far from 6 cucumber plants we've been harvesting 1-2 cucumbers per day over the past 2 weeks with more coming so long as blight doesn't hit!
Tomatoes and ground cherries have another few weeks and beans are pumping.
Squash has another month at least, with at least (I hope) one squash on each plant. Raised bed garden updates. There will be a harvest! 
So far from 6 cucumber plants we've been harvesting 1-2 cucumbers per day over the past 2 weeks with more coming so long as blight doesn't hit!
Tomatoes and ground cherries have another few weeks and beans are pumping.
Squash has another month at least, with at least (I hope) one squash on each plant.

Plants

Everything is growing well! Looking forward to identifying the cucumbers to see which are the most prolific. Really hoping some of the white cucumbers show up.

Everything is growing well! Looking forward to identifying the cucumbers to see which are the most prolific. Really hoping some of the white cucumbers show up. Everything is growing well! Looking forward to identifying the cucumbers to see which are the most prolific. Really hoping some of the white cucumbers show up. Everything is growing well! Looking forward to identifying the cucumbers to see which are the most prolific. Really hoping some of the white cucumbers show up.

Melons are slow to start, but I’ve been feeding them quite a bit. Rotting grass clippings, and fermented plant juice made from dandelion leaves.

Melons are slow to start, but I've been feeding them quite a bit. Rotting grass clippings, and fermented plant juice made from dandelion leaves.

Kousa dogwood is slow to grow, not sure what’s going on. Ground cherry doing well. Underplanted with some beans just for fun and they’re popping up nicely. Strawberry plant is massive, and pumping out a few strawberries per day.

Kousa dogwood is slow to grow, not sure what's going on. Ground cherry doing well. Underplanted with some beans just for fun and they're popping up nicely. Strawberry plant is massive, and pumping out a few strawberries per day.

Ground cherries are growing! Slow start from seed, but once they hit their stride, they’re unstoppable! First fruits already visible, 4-5 flowers on each with new leaves and flowers appearing daily.

Ground cherries are growing! Slow start from seed, but once they hit their stride, they're unstoppable! First fruits already visible, 4-5 flowers on each with new leaves and flowers appearing daily.

Build mini-hugelkultur rings to expand newly planted tree zones. Pulled grasses/weeds, laid down layer of sticks and twigs, 4-6” layer of grass clippings then topped with 4-6” of soil.

Planted a row of echinacea and a butternut squash in the mulberry ring.

Planted a row of chives around hazelnut.

Planted a few ground cherries around the kousa dogwood.

Planted a butternut squash alongside another hazelnut.

Plants

The first morels found in the front yard were very black. Upon finding these near the wild apple trees on the deer trail I realized the black ones are just older. These ones are lighter coloured. They’ll make a great burger topping for tonight’s dinner.

The first morels found in the front yard were very black. Upon finding these near the wild apple trees on the deer trail I realized the black ones are just older. These ones are lighter coloured. They’ll make a great burger topping for tonight’s dinner.

Transplanted my two pawpaw plants out into the yard. They’re starting to look stressed in their pots (1.89 litre milk cartons) so I dug a couple deep holes in a shady spot under the hop hornbeam. Soil is sandy there so they should like it. The taproot was easily a few inches longer than the carton. Probably 12” long.

Transplanted my two pawpaw plants out into the yard. They're starting to look stressed in their pots (1.89 litre milk cartons) so I dug a couple deep holes in a shady spot under the hop hornbeam. Soil is sandy there so they should like it. The taproot was easily a few inches longer than the carton. Probably 12" long.

Plants

Kale, bok choy, turkish rocket, chiogga beets were transplanted into herb garden. Covered nightly for a week until nights reached around 10°C.

Bok choy took off — would transplant earlier next year and cover overnight.

Rocket is slow, but still alive.

Beets are stunted, not doing much but still alive.

Kale is OK, but is being outgrown by direct-sown kale planted a week later.

Plants