Permaculture companion plants for Black walnut

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Image Name Data Description Actions
Tomato Tomato
10-12
Annual, Perennial
Full sun
Moist
Light (sandy), Medium, Heavy (clay)
2.0
True
Fruit, Seed
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tomato
Fast
Garden tomato, Dumádu, Garden tomato, Love apple, Lycopersicum esculentum, Tomate, Tomato, Tomato extract containing lycopene, Tomato|thakkali, Tumatis, Lycopersicon esculentum
Solanaceae
Tomate
Oil
https://pfaf.org/User/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Solanum lycopersicum, https://pfaf.org/User/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Lycopersicon esculentum
Start seeds indoors 5-6 weeks before last frost
In containers or in rows in beds around last frost date
6.2-6.8
70-80°f
The tomato is a flowering plant native to South America. It is a member of the nightshade family and closely related to the potato. The tomato plant typically grows to a height of 1-3 meters and has a weak, hairy stem. The leaves are arranged alternately on the stem and are typically dark green in color. The plant produces small yellow or white flowers, which develop into the fruit we know as tomatoes. The fruit itself is typically red, but can also be yellow, orange, green, or purple. Indeterminate tomato plants are perennials in their native habitat, but are cultivated as annuals. Determinate, or bush, plants are annuals that stop growing at a certain height and produce a crop all at once. Tomatoes prefer warm, sunny growing conditions and well-drained, humus-rich soil. They can be grown in a variety of soil types, but perform best in soil with a pH between 6 and 6.8. In order to cultivate tomatoes successfully, growers may need to provide support for the plant (such as a stake or cage) to prevent the fruit from weighing down the stem, and may also need to water and fertilize the plant regularly. Tomatoes are generally considered to be frost-sensitive, so in areas with cold winters they may need to be grown in a greenhouse or indoors. There are a great number of cultivars. The edible parts of the tomato plant are the fruit and the leaves. The fruit can be eaten raw or cooked, and is commonly used in a variety of dishes, such as salads, sandwiches, and pasta. The leaves, although not commonly eaten, are also edible and have a slightly bitter taste. After harvest, tomatoes can be stored at room temperature, in a cool place, or in the refrigerator. Show

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Red currant Red currant
4-8
Perennial
Full sun, Partial sun/shade
Moist
Light (sandy), Medium, Heavy (clay)
Deciduous
1.2
Shrubs
Animal feed, Attracts insects, Hedgerow, Poultry forage
true
Fruit
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Redcurrant
Cultivated currant
Grossulariaceae
true
true
https://pfaf.org/User/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Ribes rubrum
The red currant is a shrub that is native to parts of Europe and Asia. It typically grows to a height of 1-2 meters and has a bushy, upright growth habit. The leaves are simple and oval-shaped, with smooth edges and a dark green color. The flowers are small and greenish-white, growing in clusters at the ends of the branches. The fruit is a small, spherical berry that is typically red, although there are also varieties with yellow, pink, or black fruit. Red currants prefer cool, moist growing conditions and do best in well-drained, slightly acidic soil. They are winter hardy and can tolerate some frost, but may require protection in very cold climates. In general, red currants are easy to grow and do not require much special care. The edible parts of the red currant are the fruit and the leaves. The fruit can be eaten fresh or used in jams, jellies, and other preserves. The leaves can be brewed into a tea with a slightly tart flavor. The fruit and leaves can be stored in a cool, dry place after harvest. Red currants have a number of uses in the garden and landscape. The fruit is attractive to birds and other wildlife, and the shrubs can be used as a source of food and shelter for a variety of animals. The plants also have some medicinal uses, with the leaves and fruit being used in traditional remedies for a variety of conditions. Additionally, the leaves and fruit can be used as a natural dye for fabrics and other materials. Show

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Redbud Redbud
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cercis_canadensis
true
Medium
Moist
Full sun, Partial sun/shade
4-9
Trees
Eastern redbud, mexican redbud, texas redbud
Light (sandy), Medium
Fabaceae or leguminosae
12
true
true
Flowers, Leaves, Seedpod
Attracts insects, Hedgerow
Perennial
Deciduous
https://pfaf.org/User/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Cercis canadensis
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Black mulberry Black mulberry
5-9
Perennial
Full sun, Partial sun/shade
Moist
Light (sandy), Medium, Heavy (clay)
Deciduous
10.0
Trees
Animal feed, Poultry forage
true
Fruit
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Morus_nigra
Slow
Moraceae
Schwarze maulbeere
true
https://pfaf.org/User/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Morus nigra
The black mulberry (Morus nigra) is a species of mulberry native to southwestern Asia, including Iran, Afghanistan, and Pakistan. It is a small to medium-sized tree that grows to be about 20-30 feet tall and has a round, dense canopy. The leaves of the black mulberry are dark green and glossy on the top, and paler and slightly hairy on the bottom. The tree produces small, white flowers in the spring, which are followed by black, juicy fruits in the summer. The black mulberry is relatively fast-growing and can reach its full size in about 10-15 years. It prefers well-drained, fertile soil and full sun, but can tolerate partial shade. It is also winter hardy and can withstand temperatures down to about -10°F. The fruits of the black mulberry are edible and can be eaten fresh or used in jams, jellies, and other preserves. They can also be dried and stored for later use. The leaves of the black mulberry can be fed to silkworms, and the wood of the tree is strong and durable, making it suitable for a variety of uses. In addition to its edible fruits, the black mulberry has several other uses. Its leaves can be used as a natural fertilizer, and the tree can provide shade and wind protection in gardens and farms. The black mulberry is also a popular food source for birds and other wildlife. Show

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Black elderberry Black elderberry
5-7
Perennial
Full sun, Partial sun/shade
Moist
Light (sandy), Medium, Heavy (clay)
Deciduous
6
Shrubs
Animal feed, Attracts insects, Hedgerow, Poultry forage, Wind breaker, Dye
true
Flowers, Fruit
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sambucus_nigra
Fast
Black elderberry, american black elderberry, blue elderberry, europea, european elder, european black elderberry
Caprifoliaceae
true
true
true
https://pfaf.org/User/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Sambucus nigra
Black elderberry, or Sambucus nigra, is a plant native to many parts of Europe, North America, and Asia. It is a deciduous shrub or small tree that can grow to a height of around 10-12 feet. The leaves are pinnate, with 5-9 leaflets, and the stem is often covered in a downy, greyish-white pubescence. The plant produces clusters of small, white or cream-colored flowers in the spring, which are followed by dark purple or black berries in the summer and fall. Black elderberry prefers moist, well-drained soil and full sun to partial shade, but can tolerate a range of soil types and conditions. It can be grown from seed or propagated from cuttings, but is typically propagated by root division or layering. It is winter hardy and can withstand temperatures as low as -30°F when established. The berries of the black elderberry are edible, but should not be eaten raw as they contain small amounts of toxic compounds. When cooked, however, the berries can be made into jams, jellies, syrups, and wines. The flowers can also be used to make elderflower cordial, which can be used as a refreshing beverage or to flavor desserts and baked goods. In addition to its culinary uses, black elderberry has a number of medicinal properties. The berries, flowers, and leaves have all been used to treat various ailments, including colds, flu, and other respiratory infections. The plant is also said to have anti-inflammatory and immune-boosting properties. Black elderberry is valuable to wildlife as a food source, providing a source of nutrition for birds and small mammals. The plant is also a popular nectar source for bees and other pollinators. Show

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Goji Goji
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lycium_barbarum
true
Medium
Moist
Full sun, Partial sun/shade
6-9
Shrubs
Goji berry, wolfberry, box thorn, matrimony vine, chinese matrimony vine, chirchitta, chirmethi, duke of argyle's teaplant, ganger, gangro, gou qi zi, kangu, khatai, kichar, kutyafa, licium, morali, ning xia gou qi, wolfberry also known as: baies de goji, baies de lycium, barberry matrimony vine, chinese boxthorn, di gu pi, épine du christ, fructus lycii, fructus lycii berry, fruit de lycium, goji chinois, goji de l’himalaya, goji juice, jus de goji, kuko, lichi, licium barbarum, litchi, lychee, lyciet, lyciet commun, lyciet de barbarie, lycii berries, lycii fruit, lycium fruit
Light (sandy), Medium, Heavy (clay)
Solanaceae
2.5
true
Fruit, Leaves
Hedgerow, Wind breaker
Weed potential
Perennial
Deciduous
https://pfaf.org/User/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Lycium barbarum
Goji, goji berry, or wolfberry (Chinese: 枸杞; pinyin: gǒuqǐ), is the fruit of either Lycium barbarum or Lycium chinense, two closely related species of boxthorn in the nightshade family, Solanaceae. L. barbarum and L. chinense fruits are similar but can be distinguished by differences in taste and sugar content. Both species are native to Asia, and have been long used in traditional Asian cuisine. The fruit has also been an ingredient in traditional Chinese, Korean, Vietnamese, and Japanese medicine, since at least the 3rd century CE. The plant parts are called by the Latin names lycii fructus (fruit), herba lycii (leaves), etc., in modern official pharmacopeias. Show

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Sugar maple Sugar maple
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acer_saccharum
true
Slow
Moist
Full sun, Partial sun/shade
3-8
Tall trees
Florida maple, hard maple, rock maple
Light (sandy), Medium, Heavy (clay)
Aceraceae
30.0
Zucker-ahorn
true
Animal feed, Attracts insects, Wood
Inner bark, Leaves, Sap, Seed
Perennial
Deciduous
https://pfaf.org/User/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Acer saccharum
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Gooseberry Gooseberry
4-8
Perennial
Full sun, Partial sun/shade
Moist
Light (sandy), Medium, Heavy (clay)
Deciduous
1.2
Shrubs
Animal feed, Attracts insects, Hedgerow, Poultry forage
true
Fruit, Leaves
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ribes_uva-crispa
Medium
European gooseberry, american gooseberry, cu li, egres, fuge, gigadze, groseille a maquareau, groseillier, grosella blanca, grosellero, kikerberi, kryhovnik, maru suguri, stachelbeere, uva spina
Grossulariaceae
true
true
https://pfaf.org/User/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Ribes uva-crispa
The gooseberry is a plant native to Europe, northern Africa, and western Asia. It is a shrub that typically grows to 1-2 meters in height, with spiny stems and green leaves that are oval in shape. The plant produces small green or red berries that are edible. The gooseberry plant prefers to grow in full sun and well-draining soil. It can tolerate a variety of soil types but prefers a neutral to slightly acidic pH. Growers may need to prune the plant regularly to maintain its shape and encourage fruit production. The plant is winter hardy, meaning it can withstand cold temperatures without damage. The berries of the gooseberry plant are edible and can be eaten fresh or used in cooking. They are high in vitamin C and can be stored in the refrigerator for several days after harvest. The plant has a number of uses, including medicinal uses such as treating diarrhea and dysentery. The plant's leaves can also be used as a natural insect repellent. In addition to its uses for humans, the gooseberry plant is also valuable for wildlife. The plant provides food and shelter for a variety of animals, including birds, insects, and small mammals. The plant's spiny stems also provide protection for nesting birds. Overall, the gooseberry is a versatile and valuable plant for gardeners and farmers. Show

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Black raspberry Black raspberry
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rubus_occidentalis
true
Moist
Full sun, Partial sun/shade
3-7
Shrubs
Light (sandy), Medium, Heavy (clay)
Rosaceae
3.0
Schwarze himbeere
true
Tea
Fruit, Stem
Animal feed, Attracts insects, Hedgerow, Poultry forage
Perennial
Deciduous
https://pfaf.org/User/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Rubus occidentalis
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Honey locust Honey locust
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Honey_locust
true
Medium
Dry, Moist
Full sun
3-9
Tall trees
Light (sandy), Medium, Heavy (clay)
Fabaceae or leguminosae
20.0
Amerikanische gleditschie
true
Seed, Seedpod
Weed potential
Animal feed, Attracts insects, Poultry forage, Erosion control
Perennial
Deciduous
https://pfaf.org/User/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Gleditsia triacanthos
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Black locust Black locust
4-9
Perennial
Full sun
Dry, Moist
Light (sandy), Medium, Heavy (clay)
25.0
Trees
Animal feed, Attracts insects, Hedgerow, Poultry forage, Wind breaker, Wood
true
Flowers, Seed, Seedpod
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robinia_pseudoacacia
Fast
Yellow locust
Fabaceae or leguminosae
Gewöhnliche robinie
true
Oil
Weed potential
https://pfaf.org/User/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Robinia pseudoacacia
Black locust (Robinia pseudoacacia) is a fast-growing tree that is native to the eastern United States. It is a member of the pea family, Fabaceae, and is known for its fragrant, white flowers and dark, hardwood timber. Black locust trees can grow to a height of 80-100 feet and have a straight, upright growth habit. The bark is dark and furrowed, and the leaves are compound, with 7-19 oval-shaped leaflets arranged along a central stem. The flowers are fragrant and bloom in clusters in the spring, and are followed by long, slender seed pods that contain small, brown seeds. To grow black locust successfully, it is important to choose a location with well-drained, fertile soil and full sun. The tree is adaptable and can grow in a variety of soil types, but prefers moist conditions and does not tolerate drought well. Black locust can also be grown in containers, but will need to be repotted regularly to accommodate its rapid growth. Black locust wood is strong and durable, and is often used for fence posts, poles, and other construction purposes. The bark, leaves, and flowers can also be used for a variety of purposes. The bark can be used to make a yellow dye, and the leaves and flowers can be used as a natural insect repellent. The flowers are also edible, and can be used to make a sweet, fragrant tea. Black locust is also a valuable food source for wildlife, including birds, deer, and small mammals. The flowers attract bees and other pollinators, and the seeds are eaten by birds and other animals. It is important to note that, while black locust is generally safe to handle and consume, the plant contains toxic compounds that can cause irritation and allergic reactions in some people. Additionally, black locust is considered invasive in some areas, and can spread rapidly if not controlled. Show

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Parsley Parsley
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parsley
true
Medium
Moist
Full sun, Partial sun/shade
Light (sandy), Medium, Heavy (clay)
Apiaceae or umbelliferae
0.6
Petersilie
Herbs
5-8
Leaves
Biennial
https://pfaf.org/User/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Petroselinum crispum
#### Links [Parsley @ Wikipedia](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parsley) Show

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Leek Leek
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Allium_ampeloprasum
true
Dry, Moist
Full sun
5-9
Herbs
Broadleaf wild leek
Light (sandy), Medium, Heavy (clay)
Alliaceae
1.8
Lauch
Bulb, Flowers, Leaves, Root
https://pfaf.org/User/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Allium ampeloprasum
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Pedunculate Oak Pedunculate Oak
4-8
Perennial
Full sun, Partial sun/shade
Moist, Wet
Medium, Heavy (clay)
Evergreen
30.0
Tall trees
Animal feed, Hedgerow, Poultry forage, Wind breaker, Wood
True
Seed
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quercus_robur
Slow
English oak
Fagaceae
https://pfaf.org/User/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Quercus robur
Eiche
True
The pedunculate oak, also known as Quercus robur, is a type of tree that is native to Europe, Asia, and North Africa. It is a large tree that can grow to be up to 80 feet tall, with a trunk that can reach up to 4 feet in diameter. The leaves of the pedunculate oak are dark green and lobed, with a leathery texture. The tree produces small, pale green flowers that bloom in the spring, followed by acorns in the fall. The pedunculate oak prefers to grow in full sun and well-drained soil. It is a slow-growing tree, but it can live for hundreds of years. To cultivate the tree successfully, a grower should plant it in an area that receives plenty of sunlight and water it regularly during the first few years of growth. The tree is winter hardy and can withstand cold temperatures. The leaves, acorns, and bark of the pedunculate oak are all edible. The leaves can be used in salads, while the acorns can be ground into a flour and used to make bread or other baked goods. The bark can be used to make tea. After harvest, the edible parts of the tree can be stored in a cool, dry place. The pedunculate oak has many uses. It is often used as a source of wood for construction and furniture-making, and its leaves and acorns are used as food for livestock. The tree can also provide habitat and food for a variety of wildlife, including birds, squirrels, and deer. The bark of the pedunculate oak has been used medicinally in the past to treat a variety of ailments, including diarrhea, wounds, and fevers. Show

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Stinging Nettle Stinging Nettle
3-10
Perennial
Full sun, Partial sun/shade
Moist
Light (sandy), Medium, Heavy (clay)
1.2
Herbs
true
Leaves
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Urtica_dioica
Fast
California nettle, achoka, bichhu booti, bichhua, bichua, chichru, irhawurhawu, kopriva, korvenoges, krapiva, noges, patle sishnu, pokrzywa, polo, raudnoges, sishnu, sisnu, tall nettle, zara, zastisod, zocha, american stinging nettle, brandnetelwortel, brennessel, brennesselblätter, brennesselwurzel, brennnesselwurzel, brännässelrot, brännässla, brännässleblad, brændenælderod, california nettle, chalkan, chayan oot, chhoku, chichicaste, chule, chutle, common nettle, common stinging nettle for homoeopathic preparations, csalángyökér, csalánlevé, dhyo, european nettle, european stinging nettle, folia urticae, gazanda, gazaneh, gazgazuk, giant nettle, grande ortie, great nettle, greater nettle, grosse brennessel, große brennessel, gherq il-hurrieq, haarnesselwurzel, hanfnesselwurzel, hhurrayq, horeig, hyo, jhaduk, kajyang, kichitki oot, kopriva, koprivový koren, korenina koprive, korzen pokrzywy, krapiva dvudomnaya, nelau, neslerot, nesselwurzel, nettle, nettle herb, nettle leaf, nettle root, nettle stinging, nhyakan, nokkonen, juuri, nõgesejuur, natru saknes, ortica, ortica maschio, ortica radice, ortie, ortie (feuille d’), ortie (racine d'), ortie brulante, ortie dioïque, ortiga, ortiga mayor, hoja, raíz de, pokrzywa, polo, pulu, prhlavový koren, qurrays, racine d'ortie, radix urticae, raiz de ortiga, radacina de urzica, satu, sikya, sisna, sisnu, slender nettle, stinging nettle, stinging nettle herb, syak, tall nettle, tsuknida, urtica dioica, urtica dioica ad praeparationes homoeopathicas, urticae folium, urticae herba, urticae radix, urtiga, raiz, urtiga-maior, urtiga-mansa, urtiga-vermelha, urtigão, yi zhu qian ma, za-chhag, zwa, zwyczajna, isirgan
Urticaceae
Brennnessel
Oil
Weed potential
https://pfaf.org/User/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Urtica dioica
Stinging nettle (Urtica dioica) is a perennial plant that is native to many parts of Europe, Asia, and North America. It is found in a variety of habitats, including damp forests, stream banks, and meadows. Stinging nettle has green, heart-shaped leaves that are arranged opposite each other on the stem. The leaves and stems are covered with tiny, hollow hairs that can inject a painful, stinging sensation when they come into contact with skin. The plant also produces small, greenish-white flowers that grow in clusters. Stinging nettle can grow to be quite tall, sometimes reaching heights of up to six feet. It grows quickly and can spread rapidly. To cultivate stinging nettle, it is best to start with rooted cuttings or small plants. The plant prefers moist, well-draining soil and partial shade, but it can also grow in full sun. It is important to keep the soil consistently moist, especially during the plant's first growing season. Stinging nettle is edible, but the leaves and stems must be cooked or dried to remove the stinging hairs. The leaves can be used in a variety of dishes, including soups, stews, and teas. They can also be dried and stored for later use. The roots can also be eaten, but they are more difficult to harvest and prepare. Stinging nettle has a number of uses, both medicinal and practical. The leaves and stems can be used to make a tea that is rich in vitamins and minerals, and has been used to treat a variety of conditions, including arthritis, eczema, and gout. The plant can also be used as a natural fertilizer, thanks to its high nitrogen content. In addition, the leaves can be used as mulch, and the fibers from the stems can be used to make ropes and cloth. Stinging nettle is also valuable for wildlife, providing food and habitat for a variety of animals. The leaves are a source of food for many species of butterflies and moths, and the plant also provides shelter for small mammals and birds. Overall, stinging nettle is a versatile and useful plant that has a variety of applications for gardeners, farmers, and herbalists. Despite its painful sting, it is a valuable addition to any garden or landscape. Show

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Comfrey Comfrey
Perennial
Herbs
Boraginaceae
This plant is a wonderful dynamic accumulator, biomass generator, drip line extender, and all around companion plant. Show

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