Permaculture companion plants for White mulberry

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Image Name Data Description Actions
Chives Chives
3-12
Perennial
Full sun, Partial sun/shade
Moist
Light (sandy), Medium, Heavy (clay)
0.3
Herbs
Attracts insects, Ground cover
True
Bulb, Flowers, Leaves, Root
Seed - direct sow, Seed - transplant, Division
4-6 weeks before last frost
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chives
Medium
Wild chives, Flowering onion
Alliaceae
https://pfaf.org/User/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Allium schoenoprasum
14-21 days
6.0-7.0
21°c (70°f)
8-12inches
Schnittlauch
Allium
Chives (Allium schoenoprasum) are a bulb-forming herbaceous perennial plants that belong to the same family as onions, garlic, and leeks. They are native to Europe, Asia, and North America, and are commonly grown in gardens for their delicate onion flavor and attractive purple flowers. Chives are easy to grow and require little maintenance. They can be grown in pots or containers, or directly in the ground. The plants have thin, hollow leaves that grow in tight clumps and reach a height of around 12-20 inches (30-50 cm). The bulbs are slender, conical, 2–3 cm (3⁄4–1 1⁄4 in) long and 1 cm (1⁄2 in) broad, and grow in dense clusters from the roots. The scapes (or stems) are hollow and tubular, up to 50 cm (20 in) long and 2–3 mm (1⁄16–1⁄8 in) across, with a soft texture, although, prior to the emergence of a flower, they may appear stiffer than usual. The grass-like leaves, which are shorter than the scapes, are also hollow and tubular, or terete, (round in cross-section) which distinguishes it at a glance from garlic chives (Allium tuberosum). The flowers are pale purple, and star-shaped with six petals, 1–2 cm (1⁄2–3⁄4 in) wide, and produced in a dense inflorescence of 10-30 together; before opening, the inflorescence is surrounded by a papery bract. The seeds are produced in a small, three-valved capsule, maturing in summer. The herb flowers from April to May in the southern parts of its habitat zones and in June in the northern parts. Chives are often used as a seasoning in a variety of dishes, including soups, omelets, and dips. They can also be added to melted butter to make a simple but flavorful sauce for steamed vegetables. Chives are low in calories and a good source of vitamin C, making them a healthy addition to any diet. Show

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Pot marigold Pot marigold
2-11
Annual
Full sun, Partial sun/shade
Moist
Light (sandy), Medium, Heavy (clay)
0.6
Repels nematodes
Flowers, Leaves, Seed
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Calendula_officinalis
Medium
Calendula, Common marigold, Scotch marigold, Ruddles
Asteraceae or compositae
Ringelblume
https://pfaf.org/User/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Calendula officinalis
21°c (70°f)
6-14 days
5.5-7.0
15cm
60
The pot marigold, also known as Calendula officinalis, is a flowering plant probably native to southwestern Asia, western Europe, and the Mediterranean region, however, its long cultivation history makes its precise origin unknown. It is a herbaceous annual plant that typically grows to be about 12-18 inches tall, with hairy stems and leaves. The leaves are lance-shaped, with a hairy surface, and the flowers can range in colour from white through yellow and orange to red and even pink. In terms of growing conditions, the pot marigold prefers well-drained soil and full sun, although it can tolerate partial shade. It is winter hardy, but may not flower as profusely in colder climates. To cultivate it successfully, a grower should plant pot marigold seeds directly in the ground after the last frost of the season. The pot marigold has a number of uses, both culinary and medicinal. The flowers are edible and can be used to add color and flavor to salads and other dishes. The petals can also be dried and used to make tea. In terms of medicinal uses, the plant has been used for centuries to treat a variety of ailments, including wounds, infections, and skin irritation. The pot marigold is also attractive to a variety of pollinators, making it a valuable plant for attracting beneficial insects to the garden. Overall, the pot marigold is a versatile and easy-to-grow plant that is well-suited to a variety of garden settings. ### Propagation - Direct sow Direct sow in spring when light frost is still possible. Can be sown until early summer for fall blooms. ### Propagation - Transplant Sow indoors in late winter, transplant outside when risk of heavy frost has passed. #### Links [Calendula @ West Coast Seeds](https://www.westcoastseeds.com/products/zeolights-organic) Show

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Garlic Garlic
3-10
Perennial
Full sun
Dry, Moist
Light (sandy), Medium
0.6
Herbs
Bulb, Flowers, Leaves, Root, Seed
Seed - direct sow
Late autumn, Early spring
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Garlic
Cultivated garlic
Alliaceae
Knoblauch
20cm
https://pfaf.org/User/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Allium sativum
6.5-7.0
Sting and itch relief from insect bites
Fibrous
Shallow
100-150
Allium
Garlic (Allium sativum) is a bulbous perennial plant in the family Amaryllidaceae. It is native to central Asia and northeastern Iran, and has long been a staple in cuisines around the world. The plant has a distinctive appearance, with narrow, long leaves and a tall, hollow stem. The leaves are a pale green color and are attached to the stem in a spiral arrangement. The flowers are small and white, and are clustered in a spherical head at the top of the stem. Garlic plants can grow to a height of 30-150 cm (12-59 in), depending on the variety. They are relatively fast-growing plants, with the bulbs maturing in about seven months. Mulch for proper overwintering when planted in autumn. Garlic can be differentiated from other plants in the Allium genus by its distinctive flavor and aroma. It is also often distinguished by its long, narrow leaves and tall, hollow stem. Garlic prefers well-drained soil and full sun, and is typically grown from bulbs. To cultivate garlic successfully, growers should plant the bulbs in the fall, about 6-8 weeks before the first frost. The bulbs should be spaced about 10-15 cm (4-6 in) apart, with the pointed end facing up. After planting, the bulbs should be watered regularly and mulched to protect them from cold temperatures. Garlic is edible, with the bulbs and leaves being the most commonly eaten parts of the plant. The bulbs can be used fresh or cooked, and are often used as a seasoning in a wide variety of dishes. The leaves can be used fresh or cooked, and have a milder flavor than the bulbs. To harvest dig and do not pull out the bulbs. Let them dry in an airy, shady and dry spot e.g. by hanging them up. Once wrappers are dry, it can be stored at a dry place for several months. In addition to its culinary uses, garlic has a number of other uses. It is commonly used medicinally, as it has been shown to have antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory properties. It is also sometimes used as a natural insect repellent. In the garden, it can be used as a natural fertilizer, as it is believed to improve the soil and help deter pests. Garlic has value for wildlife, as it is attractive to a wide variety of pollinators, including bees, butterflies, and hummingbirds. It is also a food source for animals such as rabbits and deer. Show

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Common Grape Vine Common Grape Vine
6-10
Perennial
Full sun, Partial sun/shade
Dry, Moist
Light (sandy), Medium, Heavy (clay)
Deciduous
15-32m
Vines
True
Flowers, Fruit, Leaves, Seed
Seed - direct sow, Cuttings
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vitis_vinifera
Fast
Wine grape, Purpleleaf grape, Common grape, Angur, Diva loza, Grozde yagorida, Tumpeang ba'y chu, Uva, Vid, Vigne, Vino, Weinrebe, Aanab, Ainab, Aitoviiniköynnös, Lehti, Angoor, Angur, Blad från vinranka, Bortermo szolo levél, Cognac oil, Common grape vine, Dakh, Darakh, Drakh, Draksa, Draksh, Draksha, Draksha kottai, Draksha pondu, Drakshai, Drakya, Dry grapes, Drak?a (fruit), European grape, Feuille de vigne rouge, Folha de videira, Frunze de vita-de-vie, Gostani, Gostoni, Grape, Grape seeds oligomeric proanthocyanidins, Grape vine, Grapevine, Grapevine leaf, Kashmish, Kishmish, Kottai drakshai, Lambrusca, Lambrusque, Lie de vin, List vinica, List vinske trte, Lisc winorosli wlasciwej, Maneka, Maweez munaqqa, Maweezak kohi, Munaca, Munaqqa, Munkka, Munthringya, M?dvika, Parra, Raisins, Rote weinrebenblätter, Rød vinranke, Blad, Tikruju vynmedžiu lapai, Vid, Hoja de, Vigne, Vigne rouge, Vigne vinifère, Viinapuu lehed, Vinblad, Vine, Vinho, Vino, Vite, Foglia, Vitis vinifera, Flos, Vitis viniferae folium, Vínviðarlauf, Weinrebe, Werqa tad-dielja, Wijnstokblad, Wine, Wine grape, Zabeeb-ul-jabal, Cervený list vinné révy, Ista vinkoka lapas
Vitaceae
Weintraube
Oil
https://pfaf.org/user/plant.aspx?latinname=Vitis+Vinifera
Southern Europe, Central Europe, Southwestern asia
4.3-8.6
Tap
0.6-6m
8feet
6 weeks
20°c (69°f)
12 months
False
Druif
Vindrue
This is the common grape which has a lot of varieties but only a few are grown (commercially). Common Grape Vine (Vitis vinifera) is a species of grapevine native to the Mediterranean region, central Europe, and southwestern Asia. It is a woody perennial vine that grows to a length of 20-30 feet when supported by a trellis or other structure. The leaves are dark green and palmately lobed, with five to nine leaflets. The flowers are small and greenish-white, and are produced in clusters. The fruit is a berry, typically blue or purple in color, and is edible. In terms of growth and cultivation, Common Grape Vine prefers full sun and well-draining soil. It can be grown from cuttings or from grape seeds, and should be trained to a trellis or other support structure. In order to produce fruit, the plant must be cross-pollinated with another grapevine of a different variety. The fruit is typically harvested in the late summer or early fall. The edible fruit of the Common Grape Vine can be eaten fresh or used to make wine, juice, and other products. The fruit can be stored by freezing or canning. The leaves can also be eaten, and are commonly used in dishes such as dolma. In addition to its edible fruit, the Common Grape Vine has several other uses. The leaves can be used as a source of natural dye, and the wood can be used for fuel or to make furniture and other items. The plant also provides habitat and food for a variety of wildlife, including birds and small mammals. Fruits are used to be eaten fresh or used for producing juice, wine or vinegar. Raisins are made out of dried grapes. Leaves and flowers can be eaten too. Seeds are used to produce oil. # Propagation While propagation from seed is possible, propagating from cuttings or grafting is way more common and simple. Show

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Lemon balm Lemon balm
4-8
Perennial
Full sun, Partial sun/shade
Dry, Moist
Light (sandy), Medium
0.7
Herbs
true
Leaves
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lemon_balm
Fast
Balm, common balm, balm mit, bee balm, sweet balm
Lamiaceae or labiatae
Zitronenmelisse
Weed potential
https://pfaf.org/User/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Melissa officinalis
Lemon balm (Melissa officinalis) is a perennial herb in the mint family. It is native to the Mediterranean region, but can now be found in many parts of the world. The plant has a bushy, upright habit and can grow up to 3 feet tall. It has oval-shaped leaves that are about 2-3 inches long and have a lemon scent when crushed. The leaves are a bright green color and are slightly serrated on the edges. The plant produces small, white or pale yellow flowers that bloom in the summer. Lemon balm prefers well-drained soil and full sun to partial shade. It is relatively easy to grow and can be propagated by dividing the root ball or by taking stem cuttings. It is important to give the plant enough space to grow, as it can spread rapidly. To prevent the plant from becoming invasive, it is a good idea to regularly deadhead the flowers and trim back the stems. Lemon balm can be used in cooking and is often added to salads or used as a garnish. The leaves can also be used to make tea or added to drinks and desserts for a lemony flavor. Lemon balm is also used in traditional medicine, as it is believed to have calming and soothing effects. In the garden, lemon balm can be used as a companion plant to repel pests and attract beneficial insects. The plant is also a good source of nectar for bees and other pollinators. Overall, lemon balm is a useful and versatile herb that can be enjoyed in the kitchen and the garden. Show

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White Mustard White Mustard
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/White_mustard
true
Fast
Moist
Full sun, Partial sun/shade
5-9
Light (sandy), Medium, Heavy (clay)
Brassicaceae or cruciferae
0.6
Weißer senf
Leaves, Seed
Oil
Annual
https://pfaf.org/User/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Sinapis alba
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Nasturtium Nasturtium
6-11
Annual, Perennial
Full sun
Moist
Light (sandy), Medium
3.5
Ground cover, Herbs
Trap crop, Repels whiteflies, Repels cucumber beetles, Attracts insects, Biomass
Flowers, Leaves, Seed, Seedpod
Seed - direct sow, Seed - transplant
1 week after last frost - late spring
2-4 weeks before last frost
2 weeks after last frost
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tropaeolum_majus
Fast
Tropaeolum, Indian Cress
Tropaeolaceae
Große Kapuzinerkresse
15cm
7-12 days
12-18°C (55-65°F)
Oil
https://pfaf.org/User/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Tropaeolum majus
Tropaeolum majus, commonly known as garden nasturtium, is a flowering plant that is native to South and Central America and can be grown annually as well as perennially. It belongs to the family Tropaeolaceae, which includes around 80 species of plants. T. majus is a popular garden plant, known for its bright, colorful flowers and attractive foliage. The flowers are typically yellow, orange, or red and have a distinctive, trumpet-like shape. The leaves are rounded and have a slightly waxy texture, and the plant produces long, trailing stems that can be used to create a cascading effect in hanging baskets or other containers. To grow T. majus, it is best to start the seeds directly in the ground or in pots after the last frost has passed. The plant prefers well-drained soil and full sun, but can also tolerate partial shade. It is important to water the plants regularly, but avoid overwatering, as this can cause the leaves to rot. T. majus can also be grown in containers and trained to climb trellises or other structures. In addition to its ornamental value, T. majus is also edible. The leaves, flowers, and seeds can be used in salads and other dishes, adding a slightly spicy, peppery flavor. The plant has also been used medicinally, as the leaves and seeds contain compounds with antibacterial and antioxidant properties. T. majus has been used to treat a variety of ailments, including respiratory infections and digestive disorders. It has also been used as a natural remedy for urinary tract infections and kidney stones. However, T. majus should be used with caution, as it can cause allergic reactions in some people. Additionally, T. majus can become invasive if allowed to spread, so gardeners should take care to keep it contained. #### Links [Nasturtium @ West Coast Seeds](https://www.westcoastseeds.com/products/jewel-mix ) Show

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Chard Chard
true
Moist
Full sun
4-8
Light (sandy), Medium, Heavy (clay)
Chenopodiaceae
0.9
Swiss chard, silver beet, perpetual spinach, beet spinach, seakale beet, leaf beet
Mangold, krautstiel
Leaves, Stem
Biennial
https://pfaf.org/User/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Beta vulgaris cicla
Leaf vegetable. Leaves and stalks are edible. Closely related to the beet. Show

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Spinach Spinach
4-8
Annual
Full sun, Partial sun/shade
Moist
Light (sandy), Medium, Heavy (clay)
0.3
Herbs
Leaves, Seed
Seed - direct sow, Seed - transplant
3 weeks prior to last frost date
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spinach
Fast
Chenopodiaceae
Spinat
https://pfaf.org/User/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Spinacia oleracea
carminative, laxative, hypoglycaemic; against inflammation
from March to June; Aug to Sep
2 weeks
start seeds indoors 8 weeks prior to last frost date
Spinach (Spinacia oleracea) is a leafy green vegetable native to central and southwestern Asia. The plant has smooth, glossy, and dark green leaves that are arranged in a rosette pattern. It has a long, thick stem that is typically green or red in color, depending on the variety. The plant grows to a height of 6-8 inches and produces small, inconspicuous flowers. Spinach grows best in cool, moist conditions and prefers full sun or partial shade. To cultivate it successfully, the soil should be well-draining and rich in organic matter. The plant can be grown from seed and is typically ready for harvest in about 50-60 days. Successional sowing once per month/every two weeks is recommended for continuous supply. Spinach is highly nutritious and is a good source of vitamins A, C, and K, as well as calcium, potassium, and iron. The edible parts of the plant include the leaves and stems, which can be eaten fresh or cooked. Spinach should be stored in the refrigerator and used within a few days of harvest to maximize its nutritional value. In addition to its culinary uses, spinach has been used medicinally to treat a variety of conditions, including anemia, high blood pressure, and inflammation. The plant can also be used as a fertilizer, as its leaves are rich in nitrogen and other nutrients. Spinach can provide valuable habitat and food for a variety of wildlife, including birds and insects. Show

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Tansy Tansy
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tansy
true
Fast
Dry, Moist
Full sun
3-8
Common tansy, golden buttons, curly leaf tansy
Light (sandy), Medium, Heavy (clay)
Asteraceae or compositae
1.0
Rainfarn
Herbs
Flowers, Leaves
Weed potential
Perennial
https://pfaf.org/User/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Tanacetum vulgare
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Yarrow Yarrow
4-8
Perennial
Full sun, Partial sun/shade
Dry, Moist
Light (sandy), Medium, Heavy (clay)
0.6
Herbs
true
Leaves
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Achillea_millefolium
Fast
Boreal yarrow, california yarrow, giant yarrow, coast yarrow, western yarrow, pacific yarrow, bloodwort, carpenter's weed, common yarrow, hierba de las cortaduras, milfoil, plumajillo
Asteraceae or compositae
Gemeine schafgarbe
Weed potential
https://pfaf.org/User/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Achillea millefolium
Yarrow (Achillea millefolium) is a perennial plant that is native to temperate regions of the Northern Hemisphere, including Europe, Asia, and North America. It is commonly found in meadows, grasslands, and along roadsides. Yarrow has fern-like leaves that are divided into many narrow, tooth-like segments. The leaves are typically dark green in color and grow in a basal rosette. The plant produces small, white or pink flowers that are arranged in compact, flat-topped clusters. The flowers are attractive to pollinators such as bees and butterflies. Yarrow typically grows to a height of 30-90 cm (12-36 in) and has a spreading habit. It is a fast-growing plant that can quickly colonize an area through its rhizomatous root system. Yarrow is often differentiated from similar plants by its strongly scented leaves and its distinctive flower clusters. Yarrow prefers well-drained soils and full sun to partial shade. It is drought-tolerant and can grow in a variety of soil types, including sandy, loamy, and clay soils. To cultivate yarrow successfully, it is important to space the plants adequately to allow for good air circulation and to prevent the spread of diseases. Yarrow can also be propagated through dividing the root crowns or by planting seeds. Some parts of yarrow, such as the leaves and flowers, are edible and can be used in salads or as a garnish. The leaves have a slightly bitter, astringent flavor and can be used fresh or dried. The flowers can also be used to make tea. It is important to note that some people may experience allergic reactions to yarrow, so it is best to try a small amount first before consuming it in larger quantities. Yarrow has a long history of use in traditional medicine, where it has been used to treat a wide range of ailments, including wounds, infections, and fevers. It is also believed to have anti-inflammatory and astringent properties. In the garden, yarrow can be used as a natural insect repellent, as a mulch to suppress weeds, and as a companion plant to improve the health and vigor of other plants. Yarrow is valuable to wildlife as a nectar and pollen source for pollinators. It also provides shelter and habitat for beneficial insects, such as ladybugs and lacewings, which help to control pest populations in the garden. Overall, yarrow is a versatile and useful plant that can add beauty and functionality to a garden or farm. Show

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Comfrey Comfrey
Perennial
Herbs
Boraginaceae
This plant is a wonderful dynamic accumulator, biomass generator, drip line extender, and all around companion plant. Show

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