Permaculture companion plants for Common bean

Back to Common bean

Image Name Data Description Actions
Carrot Carrot
3-10
Biennial
Full sun
Moist
Light (sandy), Medium, Heavy (clay)
1.2
Leaves, Root
Apiaceae or Umbelliferae
Möhre, Karotte
https://pfaf.org/User/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Daucus carota sativus
Carrot (Daucus carota sativus) is a type of root vegetable that is native to Europe and Asia. It belongs to the family Apiaceae, which includes around 300 species of plants. Carrots are a popular crop, known for their sweet, crunchy roots and vibrant orange color. The plant has a tall, slender growth habit and can reach a height of up to 2-3 feet. The leaves are green and feathery, and the flowers are small and white or purple in color. To grow carrots successfully, it is important to choose a location with well-drained, sandy soil and full sun. The plant prefers cool temperatures and should be protected from frost. Carrots can also be grown in containers, and will benefit from regular watering and fertilization. The plant is relatively easy to grow and requires little maintenance, but can be susceptible to pests and diseases, such as carrot fly and root rot. Carrots are a valuable source of vitamins and minerals, and are used in a variety of dishes, including soups, stews, and salads. The roots can be eaten fresh or cooked, and can be stored in the refrigerator for several weeks. In addition to their culinary uses, carrots have a number of medicinal properties, and have been used to treat a variety of ailments, including indigestion, constipation, and respiratory disorders. Carrots are also a valuable food source for many types of wildlife, including birds, insects, and small mammals. The flowers attract bees and other pollinators, and the roots are eaten by animals such as rabbits and deer. Show

Edit
Corn Corn
2-11
Annual
Full sun
Moist
Light (sandy), Medium, Heavy (clay)
2
true
Pollen, Seed, Stem
Fast
Maize, corn, abado, able, aburow, agbado, awasi, awi, bara-jowar, bhutta, blefo, bli, buta, chujak, goinjol, gomdhan, igbado, jagung, janar, jonar, junri, kaaba, keto, kolkoti, kon, kono, kukri, maka, makai, makka jonnalu, makka-cholam, makka, makkai, makkari, makoi, masara agwado, massara, mekkejola, milho, mokka-janna, musukojola, naham, nyo, oka, oksusu, shaa, sil ni vavalagi, ta-mank, yu shu shu, ai, amylum maydis, awási, aya, corn oi, 6 corn oil (unhydrogenated), corn silk, corn starch, corn syrup solids, corn|iringu, dent corn, dura shami, field corn, flint corn, gangnaengi, granoturco, indian corn, maidis stigma, mais, maiz, aceite, maize oil, refined, maize starch, majs, maydis amylum, maydis oleum raffinatum, maydis stigma, maíz, aceite refinado, maîs, maïs, ogsusu, oleum maydis, pelos de elafe, pod corn, popcorn, refined maize oil, risoy genime sami, stigmata maidis, styli cum stigmatis zeae maydis, sweet corn, topical starch, to-morokoshi, yu mi shu, yu mi xu, zein, zorrat
Poaceae or gramineae
Mais
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maize
Oil
https://pfaf.org/User/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Zea mays
Corn (Zea mays) is a plant native to Central America and Mexico. It is a tall plant with a sturdy stem and large leaves that grow in a spiral pattern around the stem. The plant produces large, brightly colored flowers that give way to ears of corn. The ears are typically yellow, but can also be white, red, or blue. Corn grows to be anywhere from 3-12 feet tall and can grow quickly, depending on the variety. To differentiate corn from similar plants, gardeners and farmers can look for the spiral pattern of the leaves and the presence of ears. Corn is often grown in rows, which can also help to distinguish it from other plants. Corn prefers well-draining, fertile soil and full sun. In order to cultivate it successfully, a grower will need to provide these conditions and also ensure that the plants receive adequate water. Corn is often grown from seed, which should be planted in the ground when the soil has warmed to at least 60 degrees Fahrenheit. Corn is edible, and the edible parts are the kernels that are found on the ears. The ears can be harvested when the kernels are plump and fully developed. They can be stored after harvest by drying them in the sun or by freezing them. Corn has many uses. In addition to being a popular food crop, it can also be used as livestock feed and as a source of biofuel. It can also be used as a building material and for crafting. Corn has medicinal properties and has been used to treat a variety of ailments. It is also valued by wildlife, as it provides food and shelter for birds, small mammals, and insects. Show

Edit
Cucumber Cucumber
9-11
Annual
Full sun
Moist
Light (sandy), Medium, Heavy (clay)
2
Vines
Fruit, Leaves
Seed - direct sow, Seed - transplant
1 week after last frost
2-3 weeks before last frost
1 week after last frost
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cucumber
Cucurbitaceae
Gurke
50-65
23cm
6.0-6.8
15-30°C (60-85°F)
https://pfaf.org/User/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Cucumis sativus
True
Fruit
Cucumber, scientific name Cucumis sativus, is a member of the gourd family. It is native to India and other parts of Asia. Cucumber is a trailing or climbing plant that grows to a height of 5-10 feet. The leaves are dark green and glossy, and the plant produces yellow flowers. The fruit of the cucumber plant is a long, green, edible vegetable with a thin skin. Cucumbers are typically about 6-9 inches long and 2-3 inches in diameter. In terms of growth and cultivation, cucumber plants prefer warm, sunny conditions and well-draining soil. They should be watered regularly, especially during dry periods. Cucumber plants are not winter hardy and should be grown in the summer months in most climates. To cultivate cucumbers successfully, it is important to provide them with adequate space to grow and to support the plants with trellises or other means to keep the fruits off the ground. The plant will develop male and female flowers. You can recognize the female by having a tiny cucumber underneath. Sometimes the plant develops a lot of male flowers first, so be patient. If you don’t see any bees pollinating. Take a male and put it on all the female flowers. Cucumber fruits are edible and can be eaten raw, pickled, or cooked. The skin and seeds of the cucumber are edible, but some people choose to remove the seeds before eating the fruit. Cucumber fruits can be stored in the refrigerator for a few days after harvest. Cucumbers have several uses. In addition to being eaten as a vegetable, they can also be used in a variety of dishes and salads. Cucumber slices are often used as a garnish or as a refreshing addition to beverages. Cucumbers are also commonly used in natural skin care products and are believed to have anti-inflammatory and soothing properties. #### Propagation Direct sow when soil is warm enough in early summer. Sow seeds individually indoors 3-4 weeks before planting outside into warm soil. Use bottom heat if possible. Transplant when plants develop third leaf. #### Medicinal Fruit is depurative, diuretic, emollient, purgative and resolvent #### Links [Cucumber @ West Coast Seeds](https://www.westcoastseeds.com/products/patio-snacker) Show

Edit
Common Grape Vine Common Grape Vine
6-10
Perennial
Full sun, Partial sun/shade
Dry, Moist
Light (sandy), Medium, Heavy (clay)
Deciduous
15-32m
Vines
True
Flowers, Fruit, Leaves, Seed
Seed - direct sow, Cuttings
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vitis_vinifera
Fast
Wine grape, Purpleleaf grape, Common grape, Angur, Diva loza, Grozde yagorida, Tumpeang ba'y chu, Uva, Vid, Vigne, Vino, Weinrebe, Aanab, Ainab, Aitoviiniköynnös, Lehti, Angoor, Angur, Blad från vinranka, Bortermo szolo levél, Cognac oil, Common grape vine, Dakh, Darakh, Drakh, Draksa, Draksh, Draksha, Draksha kottai, Draksha pondu, Drakshai, Drakya, Dry grapes, Drak?a (fruit), European grape, Feuille de vigne rouge, Folha de videira, Frunze de vita-de-vie, Gostani, Gostoni, Grape, Grape seeds oligomeric proanthocyanidins, Grape vine, Grapevine, Grapevine leaf, Kashmish, Kishmish, Kottai drakshai, Lambrusca, Lambrusque, Lie de vin, List vinica, List vinske trte, Lisc winorosli wlasciwej, Maneka, Maweez munaqqa, Maweezak kohi, Munaca, Munaqqa, Munkka, Munthringya, M?dvika, Parra, Raisins, Rote weinrebenblätter, Rød vinranke, Blad, Tikruju vynmedžiu lapai, Vid, Hoja de, Vigne, Vigne rouge, Vigne vinifère, Viinapuu lehed, Vinblad, Vine, Vinho, Vino, Vite, Foglia, Vitis vinifera, Flos, Vitis viniferae folium, Vínviðarlauf, Weinrebe, Werqa tad-dielja, Wijnstokblad, Wine, Wine grape, Zabeeb-ul-jabal, Cervený list vinné révy, Ista vinkoka lapas
Vitaceae
Weintraube
Oil
https://pfaf.org/user/plant.aspx?latinname=Vitis+Vinifera
Southern Europe, Central Europe, Southwestern asia
4.3-8.6
Tap
0.6-6m
8feet
6 weeks
20°c (69°f)
12 months
False
Druif
Vindrue
This is the common grape which has a lot of varieties but only a few are grown (commercially). Common Grape Vine (Vitis vinifera) is a species of grapevine native to the Mediterranean region, central Europe, and southwestern Asia. It is a woody perennial vine that grows to a length of 20-30 feet when supported by a trellis or other structure. The leaves are dark green and palmately lobed, with five to nine leaflets. The flowers are small and greenish-white, and are produced in clusters. The fruit is a berry, typically blue or purple in color, and is edible. In terms of growth and cultivation, Common Grape Vine prefers full sun and well-draining soil. It can be grown from cuttings or from grape seeds, and should be trained to a trellis or other support structure. In order to produce fruit, the plant must be cross-pollinated with another grapevine of a different variety. The fruit is typically harvested in the late summer or early fall. The edible fruit of the Common Grape Vine can be eaten fresh or used to make wine, juice, and other products. The fruit can be stored by freezing or canning. The leaves can also be eaten, and are commonly used in dishes such as dolma. In addition to its edible fruit, the Common Grape Vine has several other uses. The leaves can be used as a source of natural dye, and the wood can be used for fuel or to make furniture and other items. The plant also provides habitat and food for a variety of wildlife, including birds and small mammals. Fruits are used to be eaten fresh or used for producing juice, wine or vinegar. Raisins are made out of dried grapes. Leaves and flowers can be eaten too. Seeds are used to produce oil. # Propagation While propagation from seed is possible, propagating from cuttings or grafting is way more common and simple. Show

Edit
Pot marigold Pot marigold
2-11
Annual
Full sun, Partial sun/shade
Moist
Light (sandy), Medium, Heavy (clay)
0.6
Repels nematodes
Flowers, Leaves, Seed
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Calendula_officinalis
Medium
Calendula, Common marigold, Scotch marigold, Ruddles
Asteraceae or compositae
Ringelblume
https://pfaf.org/User/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Calendula officinalis
21°c (70°f)
6-14 days
5.5-7.0
15cm
60
The pot marigold, also known as Calendula officinalis, is a flowering plant probably native to southwestern Asia, western Europe, and the Mediterranean region, however, its long cultivation history makes its precise origin unknown. It is a herbaceous annual plant that typically grows to be about 12-18 inches tall, with hairy stems and leaves. The leaves are lance-shaped, with a hairy surface, and the flowers can range in colour from white through yellow and orange to red and even pink. In terms of growing conditions, the pot marigold prefers well-drained soil and full sun, although it can tolerate partial shade. It is winter hardy, but may not flower as profusely in colder climates. To cultivate it successfully, a grower should plant pot marigold seeds directly in the ground after the last frost of the season. The pot marigold has a number of uses, both culinary and medicinal. The flowers are edible and can be used to add color and flavor to salads and other dishes. The petals can also be dried and used to make tea. In terms of medicinal uses, the plant has been used for centuries to treat a variety of ailments, including wounds, infections, and skin irritation. The pot marigold is also attractive to a variety of pollinators, making it a valuable plant for attracting beneficial insects to the garden. Overall, the pot marigold is a versatile and easy-to-grow plant that is well-suited to a variety of garden settings. ### Propagation - Direct sow Direct sow in spring when light frost is still possible. Can be sown until early summer for fall blooms. ### Propagation - Transplant Sow indoors in late winter, transplant outside when risk of heavy frost has passed. #### Links [Calendula @ West Coast Seeds](https://www.westcoastseeds.com/products/zeolights-organic) Show

Edit
Marjoram Marjoram
6-9
Perennial
Full sun, Partial sun/shade
Dry, Moist
Light (sandy), Medium, Heavy (clay)
0.6
Herbs
true
Leaves
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marjoram
Lamiaceae or labiatae
Majoran
https://pfaf.org/User/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Origanum majorana
Marjoram (Origanum majorana) is a herbaceous plant that is native to the Mediterranean region. It has delicate, oval-shaped leaves that are pale green in color, and small white or pink flowers that grow in clusters. The plant grows to a height of about 30 cm and has a woody stem. In terms of growing conditions, marjoram prefers well-drained, light soil and full sun to partial shade. It can be grown from seeds or cuttings, and should be spaced about 30 cm apart. Marjoram is winter hardy in mild climates, but may need to be protected or brought indoors in colder regions. Marjoram has a number of culinary uses. It is often used as a flavoring in soups, stews, and sauces, and can be added to salads and other dishes as a garnish. The leaves and flowers of the plant are edible and can be used fresh or dried. When harvesting marjoram, it is best to pick the leaves early in the morning when they are at their most flavorful. The leaves can be stored in an airtight container in a cool, dark place for up to six months. In addition to its culinary uses, marjoram has also been used medicinally as an antiseptic and as a remedy for digestive problems. It is also sometimes used in perfumes and soaps. Marjoram is not particularly attractive to wildlife, but it can provide habitat for some beneficial insects such as bees and butterflies. Show

Edit
Okra Okra
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Okra
true
Moist
Full sun
5-11
A-koto, angu, apala, asowntem, bakhua-mun, bamia, bandakka, bendi, bhindee, bhindi, binda, bindi, bondo, cantarela, derere rechipudzi, derere, dheras, dherosh, enmomi, fetri, gombaut, gombo, gumbo, guro, gusha, hakuyot, idelele, ikhievbo, ilasha, ilo, ka fei huang kui, kacang bendi, kaganh lender, kandia, kandjie, kopi arab, krachiap-mon, kubewa, lafeu, lieka, loka, maana, ma-lontho, mesta, muomi, miagorro, nathando, nkruma, obori, ochro, okworu, okwulu, otigo-iwoka, pahari bendi, pingpesi, poot barang, pui, quiabo, quimbambo, saluyot a bunga, sayur bendi, taku, uisul hme, vandakai, vandikkai, vendal, wayika, you-padi
Light (sandy), Medium, Heavy (clay)
Malvaceae
1.0
Herbs
Fruit, Leaves, Root, Seed
Oil
Weed potential
Annual, Perennial
https://pfaf.org/User/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Abelmoschus esculentus
Show

Edit
Parsley Parsley
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parsley
true
Medium
Moist
Full sun, Partial sun/shade
Light (sandy), Medium, Heavy (clay)
Apiaceae or umbelliferae
0.6
Petersilie
Herbs
5-8
Leaves
Biennial
https://pfaf.org/User/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Petroselinum crispum
#### Links [Parsley @ Wikipedia](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parsley) Show

Edit
Parsnip Parsnip
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parsnip
true
Moist
Full sun, Partial sun/shade
4-8
Wild parsnip
Light (sandy), Medium, Heavy (clay)
Apiaceae or umbelliferae
1.0
Pastinake
Roots
Leaves, Root, Seed
Weed potential
Biennial
https://pfaf.org/User/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Pastinaca sativa
Show

Edit
Potato Potato
3-10
Perennial
Full sun
Moist
Light (sandy), Medium, Heavy (clay)
1.0
Root
Seed - direct sow
April
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Potato
Irish potato, Andigena
Solanaceae
Kartoffel
https://pfaf.org/User/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Solanum tuberosum
12 inches
Potato (Solanum tuberosum) is a herbaceous perennial plant that is native to the Andean region of South America. It is a member of the nightshade family (Solanaceae) and is closely related to other nightshades such as tomatoes, eggplants, and bell peppers. The potato plant has a bushy growth habit and can grow to heights of 30-150 cm depending on the variety. The leaves are large, heart-shaped, and alternate along the stem. The flowers are white or purple and have five petals. The plant produces small green berries that contain numerous seeds, but most varieties of potatoes are propagated vegetatively from tubers rather than from seeds. The edible part of the potato plant is the tuber, which is an underground stem that is modified for food storage. Potatoes come in a wide range of shapes, sizes, and colors including white, yellow, red, and purple. The size and shape of the tuber depends on the variety, with some varieties producing small, round tubers and others producing large, elongated tubers. Potatoes grow best in well-draining, fertile soils in a sunny location with a pH of 4.5-6.0. They require regular watering and should be planted in a location with good air circulation to prevent fungal diseases. Potatoes are typically planted from tubers that have been treated with a fungicide to prevent disease and are spaced 25-30 cm apart in rows that are 75-90 cm apart. The tubers will begin to form in the soil around 6-8 weeks after planting and can be harvested when they reach the desired size. Potatoes are a versatile and nutritious food source that is rich in vitamins, minerals, and fiber. The tubers are eaten cooked, baked, fried, or mashed, and the leaves and flowers of the plant can also be eaten. Potatoes can be stored in a cool, dry, and dark place for several months. Potatoes have a number of uses beyond their value as a food source. The tubers can be used as seed potatoes for planting, and the leaves and stems can be used as a natural insecticide or as mulch in the garden. In some parts of the world, potatoes are also used for their medicinal properties. Potatoes are a valuable food source for a variety of wildlife, including deer, rabbits, and squirrels. The flowers of the potato plant are also a source of nectar for bees and other pollinators. Show

Edit
Rosemary Rosemary
6-11
Perennial
Full sun
Dry, Moist
Light (sandy), Medium
Evergreen
1.5
Herbs
Attracts insects, Hedgerow
true
Leaves
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rosemary
Medium
Lamiaceae or labiatae
true
Rosmarinus officinale, rosmarinus officinalis
https://pfaf.org/User/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Rosmarinus officinalis
Rosemary (Salvia rosmarinus) is a woody, perennial herb native to the Mediterranean region. It is an evergreen shrub that grows to a height of 1-2 meters and has narrow, linear leaves that are about 2-4 cm long and 1-2 mm wide. The leaves are dark green in color and have a strong, pungent aroma. The flowers of rosemary are blue, purple, or white in color and grow in clusters on the tips of the branches. Rosemary prefers well-drained soil and full sun, and it grows best in temperate climates. It can be grown in a variety of soil types, including sandy and loamy soils, but it does not tolerate wet or waterlogged conditions. To cultivate rosemary successfully, the plant should be watered regularly during the growing season and pruned regularly to maintain its shape. Rosemary's leaves are edible and can be used as a seasoning in a variety of dishes. The leaves can be dried and stored for later use, or they can be used fresh. They can also be used to make tea. Rosemary has a number of uses, including as a medicinal herb and as a source of essential oils. It has been used to treat a variety of ailments, including indigestion, headaches, and muscle pain. It has also been used to improve memory and cognitive function. In addition, rosemary has been used as a fertility aid and to improve circulation. Rosemary is not particularly valuable as a food source for wildlife, but it can provide shelter and habitat for a variety of animals. It is often used as a decorative plant in gardens and landscaping. Show

Edit
Sage Sage
3-11
Annual, Perennial
Full sun
Dry, Moist
Light (sandy), Medium
Evergreen
0.6
Herbs
Flowers, Leaves
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salvia_officinalis
Medium
Kitchen sage, Small Leaf Sage, Garden Sage, Adacayi, Broadleaf sage, Ching-chieh, Common sage, Echter salbei, Mariyamiya, Sa er wei ya, Salbei, Salie, Salva, Salvia, Sauge commune, Sauge officinale, Sauge, Shalfey, True sage
Lamiaceae or Labiatae
Salbei
https://pfaf.org/User/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Salvia officinalis
Sage is a perennial herb native to the Mediterranean region. It has woody stems with gray-green leaves that are typically 2-4 inches long and have a soft, velvety texture. The flowers of sage are small and typically blue or purple, although they can also be white or pink. Sage grows to a height of about 2-3 feet and has a spreading habit. Sage prefers well-drained, sandy soil and full sun, and is drought-tolerant once established. It is winter hardy in most climates, but may need to be protected in very cold regions. To cultivate sage successfully, it is important to prune the plant regularly to promote new growth and prevent the plant from becoming woody. The leaves of sage are edible and have a strong, savory flavor. They can be used fresh or dried and are often used in dishes such as stuffings, sausages, and marinades. The leaves can also be stored for later use by drying them and storing them in an airtight container. Sage has a number of uses beyond its culinary value. It has traditionally been used for its medicinal properties, and is said to have antibacterial and anti-inflammatory effects. It is also often used as a fertility herb and is said to promote lactation in nursing mothers. Sage can also be used as a natural insect repellent and as a mulch to suppress weeds. Sage is valued by wildlife for its nectar, which attracts bees and other pollinators. It is also an important host plant for the larvae of several species of butterflies and moths. In addition, the leaves of sage can be used as a natural insecticide to control aphids and other garden pests. In humid zones above 9 it might be only possible to grow as an annual. Show

Edit
Savoy cabbage Savoy cabbage
true
Moist
Full sun, Partial sun/shade
7-11
Light (sandy), Medium, Heavy (clay)
Brassicaceae or cruciferae
0.8
Wirsing
Leaves
Annual, Biennial
https://pfaf.org/User/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Brassica oleracea sabauda
Savoy cabbage is a winter vegetable. The leaves can be eaten. Show

Edit
Squash Squash
2-11
Annual
Full sun, Partial sun/shade
Moist
Light (sandy), Medium, Heavy (clay)
0.6
Vines
Flowers, Fruit, Leaves, Seed
Seed - transplant
after last frost
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cucurbita_moschata
Fast
Crookneck squash
Cucurbitaceae
Kürbis
Oil
https://pfaf.org/User/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Cucurbita moschata
boiled root is galactogogue, anthelmintic
5.5-5.9
sow seeds in pots in a greenhouse
2 weeks
Squash, also known as Cucurbita moschata, is a plant that is native to the Americas. It is commonly used in gardens and farms for its edible fruits and leaves. Squash plants can grow to be quite large, with some varieties reaching heights of up to 10 feet. They tend to grow quickly, with a mature plant producing fruit within a few months of planting. In terms of growing conditions, squash plants prefer full sun and well-draining soil. They also need plenty of water, especially during the hot summer months. To cultivate squash successfully, a grower may need to provide adequate space for the plant to spread out, as well as support for the vines and fruit. Squash needs lots nutrition and therefore needs good soil. It can also be grown on compost The edible parts of squash plants include the fruit and leaves. The fruit can be stored after harvest by keeping it in a cool, dry place. The leaves can also be eaten, either cooked or raw, and can be stored in the same way as the fruit. The fruit can be used in a variety of dishes, including soups, stews, and baked goods. The leaves can be used as a substitute for spinach in many recipes. In addition to its culinary uses, squash has a number of medicinal uses. The leaves have been used to treat a variety of ailments, including infections and inflammation. Squash plants can also be used for fertility, as the large leaves provide shade and moisture for the soil. They can also be used as mulch, wind protection, and ground cover. Show

Edit
Beet Beet
4-8
Biennial
Full sun
Moist
Light (sandy), Medium, Heavy (clay)
Deciduous
0.9
True
Leaves, Root
Seed - direct sow, Seed - transplant
2-3 weeks before last frost, 6-8 weeks before the first frost
6-8 weeks before last frost
2 weeks before last frost
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/beta_vulgaris
Chenopodiaceae
Rübe
https://pfaf.org/user/plant.aspx?latinname=beta vulgaris craca
6.0-6.8
10°c (50°f)
5-12 days
1.5 cm
20cm
45-65
Beta vulgaris subsp. vulgaris Conditiva Group, beetroot
Beet (Beta vulgaris vulgaris), also known as garden beet, red beet, or table beet, is a plant that is native to the Mediterranean region. It is a biennial plant that typically grows to a height of 0.5-1.5 feet and has dark green leaves that are long and rounded, with a smooth or slightly hairy texture. The stem is usually light green in color, and the plant produces small, white or yellow flowers. Beet plants grow best in well-drained soil that is rich in organic matter, and they prefer full sun to partial shade. To cultivate beets successfully, a grower will need to keep the soil moist and weed-free, and may need to thin the plants to allow for proper growth. Beets are edible, and the most commonly eaten part of the plant is the root, which is typically red or purple in color. The leaves of the plant can also be eaten, and are often used in salads. Beets can be stored after harvest by washing and trimming the roots, and then storing them in a cool, dark place. Beets have a number of uses, both culinary and non-culinary. In the kitchen, beets can be cooked in a variety of ways, including boiling, roasting, and grilling. They can also be used to add color and flavor to salads, soups, and stews. In addition to their culinary uses, beets have a number of medicinal properties and have been used to treat a variety of ailments, including indigestion, constipation, and inflammation. Beets are also valuable for their ability to improve soil fertility, as their leaves and roots contain high levels of nitrogen and other nutrients. They can be used as a natural fertilizer, and can also be used as a mulch or as a ground cover to help control weeds. Beets are not particularly attractive to wildlife, but they can provide food for a variety of animals, including deer, rabbits, and birds. Overall, beets are a versatile and valuable plant that is widely cultivated by gardeners and farmers for their edible roots and leaves, as well as for their potential uses in medicine and agriculture. ### Links [How to Grow Beets @ Harvest to Table](https://harvesttotable.com/how_to_grow_beets/) Show

Edit
Chard Chard
true
Moist
Full sun
4-8
Light (sandy), Medium, Heavy (clay)
Chenopodiaceae
0.9
Swiss chard, silver beet, perpetual spinach, beet spinach, seakale beet, leaf beet
Mangold, krautstiel
Leaves, Stem
Biennial
https://pfaf.org/User/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Beta vulgaris cicla
Leaf vegetable. Leaves and stalks are edible. Closely related to the beet. Show

Edit
Broccoli Broccoli
2-11
Annual, Biennial
Full sun, Partial sun/shade
Moist
Light (sandy), Medium, Heavy (clay)
0.9
Flowers, Leaves
6-8 weeks before last frost
Brassicaceae or Cruciferae
Brokkoli
https://pfaf.org/User/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Brassica oleracea italica
50-100
45cm
6.0-7.0
7-10 days
4°C (40°F)
Broccoli is a plant that is native to the Mediterranean region. It is part of the Brassica oleracea family, which also includes other vegetables such as cauliflower and cabbage. Broccoli plants have green, flowering heads that are similar in appearance to cauliflower. The stems are typically thick and can grow to be quite large, depending on the variety of broccoli. The leaves of the plant are typically dark green and are arranged in a spiral pattern along the stem. When it comes to growing conditions, broccoli prefers cool weather and well-draining soil. It is a relatively fast-growing plant, with the flowering heads typically forming in the first year. To cultivate broccoli successfully, a grower will need to make sure the plant gets enough water and sunlight, and provide it with the necessary nutrients through fertilization. In terms of winter hardiness, broccoli is not very frost-tolerant, so it is typically grown as a cool-season crop in areas with mild winters. In terms of edibility, broccoli is a very nutritious vegetable that is packed with vitamins and minerals. The flowering heads and the stems are both edible, and can be cooked in a variety of ways. After harvest, broccoli can be stored in the refrigerator for several days, or frozen for longer-term storage. ### Propagation - Direct sow Sow seeds 7cm apart, thin when seedlings reach 5-7cm in height. ### Propagation - Transplant Start seeds 6-8 weeks before your last frost date, or 2-3 weeks before last frost date. Plant outside when seedlings are 4-6 weeks old, or have 4-5 leaves. #### Links [Broccoli @ Almanac](https://www.almanac.com/plant/broccoli) Show

Edit
Brussel Sprouts Brussel Sprouts
true
Moist
Full sun, Partial sun/shade
Light (sandy), Medium, Heavy (clay)
Brassicaceae or cruciferae
1.2
Rosenkohl
Leaves
Biennial
https://pfaf.org/User/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Brassica oleracea gemmifera
A leaf vegetable in the cabbage family. Show

Edit
Eggplant Eggplant
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eggplant
true
Moist
Full sun
8-11
Eggplant
Light (sandy), Medium, Heavy (clay)
Solanaceae
1.0
Aubergine
Fruit, Leaves
Perennial
https://pfaf.org/User/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Solanum melongena
Show

Edit
Tomato Tomato
10-12
Annual, Perennial
Full sun
Moist
Light (sandy), Medium, Heavy (clay)
2.0
True
Fruit, Seed
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tomato
Fast
Garden tomato, Dumádu, Garden tomato, Love apple, Lycopersicum esculentum, Tomate, Tomato, Tomato extract containing lycopene, Tomato|thakkali, Tumatis, Lycopersicon esculentum
Solanaceae
Tomate
Oil
https://pfaf.org/User/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Solanum lycopersicum, https://pfaf.org/User/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Lycopersicon esculentum
Start seeds indoors 5-6 weeks before last frost
In containers or in rows in beds around last frost date
6.2-6.8
70-80°f
The tomato is a flowering plant native to South America. It is a member of the nightshade family and closely related to the potato. The tomato plant typically grows to a height of 1-3 meters and has a weak, hairy stem. The leaves are arranged alternately on the stem and are typically dark green in color. The plant produces small yellow or white flowers, which develop into the fruit we know as tomatoes. The fruit itself is typically red, but can also be yellow, orange, green, or purple. Indeterminate tomato plants are perennials in their native habitat, but are cultivated as annuals. Determinate, or bush, plants are annuals that stop growing at a certain height and produce a crop all at once. Tomatoes prefer warm, sunny growing conditions and well-drained, humus-rich soil. They can be grown in a variety of soil types, but perform best in soil with a pH between 6 and 6.8. In order to cultivate tomatoes successfully, growers may need to provide support for the plant (such as a stake or cage) to prevent the fruit from weighing down the stem, and may also need to water and fertilize the plant regularly. Tomatoes are generally considered to be frost-sensitive, so in areas with cold winters they may need to be grown in a greenhouse or indoors. There are a great number of cultivars. The edible parts of the tomato plant are the fruit and the leaves. The fruit can be eaten raw or cooked, and is commonly used in a variety of dishes, such as salads, sandwiches, and pasta. The leaves, although not commonly eaten, are also edible and have a slightly bitter taste. After harvest, tomatoes can be stored at room temperature, in a cool place, or in the refrigerator. Show

Edit
Kale Kale
5-10
Biennial, Perennial
Full sun, Partial sun/shade
Moist
Light (sandy), Medium, Heavy (clay)
Deciduous
0.9
Herbs
True
Leaves
Seed - direct sow, Seed - transplant
At last frost date
4-6 weeks before last frost
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kale
Brassicaceae, Cruciferae
https://pfaf.org/User/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Brassica oleracea acephala
6.0-6.8
Shallow
45cm
7-10 days
0.5 cm
True
Fast
60
Kale (/keɪl/) is a hardy, leafy green vegetable that is a member of the Brassica oleracea species. It is native to the eastern Mediterranean and Asia Minor, and has been cultivated for food for over 2000 years. Kale plants typically have green or purple leaves that are deeply lobed and can grow up to 2 feet in length. The leaves are attached to a central stem and don't make a head, and the plant produces small, yellow flowers. Kales are considered to be closer to wild cabbage than most of the many domesticated forms of Brassica oleracea. In terms of growing conditions, kale prefers cool weather and does well in full sun to partial shade. It can be grown year-round in mild climates, but in colder climates it is best grown in the fall and early spring. To cultivate kale successfully, it is important to provide the plants with plenty of moisture and to regularly fertilize them. Kale is also a good companion plant for other vegetables, as it can help to deter pests and improve the health of the soil. In terms of edibility, kale is highly nutritious and can be eaten raw or cooked. The leaves and stems are both edible, and the plant can be stored in the refrigerator for several days after harvest. Kale can be used in a variety of dishes, including soups, salads, and smoothies. It can also be cooked and served as a side dish, or used as a garnish. In addition to its culinary uses, kale has a number of other uses. It is often used as a cover crop, as it can help to improve the fertility of the soil. Kale leaves can also be used as a mulch, as they break down readily and release nutrients into the soil. Additionally, kale plants can be used for wind protection, as their large leaves and sturdy stems can provide a barrier to wind. ### Links [Kale @ West Coast Seeds](https://www.westcoastseeds.com/blogs/how-to-grow/grow-kale-collards) Show

Edit
Lettuce Lettuce
5-9
Annual, Biennial
Full sun, Partial sun/shade
Moist
Light (sandy), Medium
0.9
Herbs
true
Leaves, Seed
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lettuce
Garden lettuce
Asteraceae or compositae
Blattsalat
Oil
https://pfaf.org/User/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Lactuca sativa
Lettuce, Lactuca sativa, is a plant native to the Mediterranean region. It has green, elongated leaves that form a loose head. The stem is relatively short and the plant grows to a height of about 8-12 inches. Lettuce is a fast-growing plant, with some varieties able to be harvested in as little as 45 days. Lettuce can be differentiated from similar plants by its elongated leaves and loose head formation. It is also relatively short compared to other leafy green plants like kale and spinach. Lettuce prefers cool temperatures and grows best in full sun or partial shade. It is a hardy plant and can tolerate light frost, but will not survive extreme cold. To cultivate lettuce successfully, growers should ensure that the soil is well-drained and moist, and that the plants are spaced appropriately. Lettuce is edible and the leaves can be eaten raw in salads or cooked. The leaves can also be stored by washing and drying them, and then wrapping them in a damp paper towel before placing them in the refrigerator. Lettuce has a number of uses. It is a popular ingredient in salads and other dishes, and has been used medicinally to treat a variety of ailments, including insomnia and digestive issues. Show

Edit
Strawberry Strawberry
4-8
Perennial
Full sun, Partial sun/shade
Moist
Light (sandy), Medium, Heavy (clay)
0.3
Herbs
Ground cover
True
Fruit, Leaves
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Strawberry
Rosaceae
Erdbeere
https://pfaf.org/User/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Fragaria x ananassa
Aardbei
Jordbær
Strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa) is a popular fruit-bearing plant that is native to parts of the Americas, Europe, and Asia. It is a member of the Rosaceae family and is closely related to other fruit-bearing plants such as raspberries and blackberries. The plant has a low-growing, spreading habit, with leaves that are typically green and glossy, and white flowers that give way to red, juicy berries. The fruits are edible and are often eaten fresh, used in jams and jellies, or baked in desserts. Strawberry plants prefer well-draining, moist soil and plenty of sunlight. They can be grown in a variety of climates, but they tend to thrive in temperate regions with cool summers and mild winters. To cultivate the plants successfully, a grower may need to provide adequate irrigation, fertilizer, and pest control. One of the distinctive features of strawberry plants is their runners, which are long, slender stems that grow horizontally along the ground. These runners can be used to propagate new plants, which can be grown in rows or beds to form a dense, ground-covering mat. In addition to their value as a food source, strawberry plants are also prized for their attractiveness to pollinators and other beneficial insects. They are often used in home gardens and on small farms as a way to attract bees, butterflies, and other insects that help to pollinate other plants. Overall, strawberries are a versatile and valuable plant that is prized by gardeners and farmers alike for their delicious fruit and their ability to attract wildlife. Show

Edit
Cauliflower Cauliflower
true
Moist
Full sun, Partial sun/shade
3-10
Light (sandy), Medium, Heavy (clay)
Brassicaceae or cruciferae
0.8
Blumenkohl
Flowers, Leaves
Annual, Biennial
https://pfaf.org/User/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Brassica oleracea botrytis
Annual plant reproduced by seed. Show

Edit
Pea Pea
3-9
Annual
Full sun
Moist
Light (sandy), Medium
2.0
Vines
Nitrogen fixer
true
Leaves, Seed
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pea
Fabaceae or leguminosae
Erbse
https://pfaf.org/User/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Pisum sativum
Peas are a type of legume, native to western Asia and the Near East. They are an annual plant, meaning they grow, flower, and produce seeds within a single growing season. Peas have tendrils that allow them to climb, and their leaves are typically made up of two oblong leaflets and a tendril on a single petiole. Peas produce clusters of small, fragrant flowers that can be white, pink, or purple in color. The flowers give way to pod-like fruits that contain the peas. Peas are a cool-season crop, and prefer to grow in well-drained soil that is high in organic matter. They can tolerate some shade, but will produce the best yields when grown in full sun. Peas can be differentiated from similar plants by their tendrils and the clusters of small, fragrant flowers that they produce. Peas are a relatively small plant, typically growing to a height of one to two feet. They can be grown in rows or as a companion plant, and will typically take between 60 and 90 days to reach maturity. Peas are not winter hardy, and should be planted in the spring as soon as the soil can be worked. Peas are edible, and the seeds inside the pods can be eaten fresh or dried for storage. The leaves and stems of the pea plant can also be eaten, and are a good source of vitamins and minerals. Peas can be used in a variety of dishes, and are a common ingredient in soups, stews, and casseroles. In addition to their culinary uses, peas are also valued for their ability to fix nitrogen in the soil. This makes them a valuable crop for improving soil fertility, and they are often grown as a cover crop or rotated with other crops to improve the overall health of the soil. Peas are also valued by wildlife, and their flowers and seeds are a favorite food for birds and other animals. Show

Edit
Radish Radish
2-11
Annual
Full sun, Partial sun/shade
Moist
Light (sandy), Medium, Heavy (clay)
0.5
Roots
true
Flowers, Leaves, Root, Seed, Seedpod
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Radish
Fast
Cultivated radish
Brassicaceae or cruciferae
Rettich
Oil
Weed potential
https://pfaf.org/User/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Raphanus sativus
The radish, also known as Raphanus sativus, is a plant native to southwestern Asia and the eastern Mediterranean region. It is a cool-season annual that grows quickly, often maturing in just a few weeks. The radish has a distinctive round or oblong shape, with a crisp and juicy texture. Its skin is typically red or white, but can also be purple, yellow, or black. The leaves of the radish are elongated and dark green in color, while its flowers are small and white or yellow in color. Radishes are relatively small, typically growing to be about four inches long and two inches wide. They prefer well-drained soil that is high in organic matter, and can be grown in a variety of climates, including temperate and subtropical regions. Radishes are typically differentiated from similar plants, such as turnips, by their smaller size and more pungent flavor. They can be harvested at any stage of their growth, but are typically harvested when they are young and tender for the best flavor. To cultivate radishes successfully, a grower will need to plant them in well-prepared soil, water them regularly, and thin out the plants to prevent overcrowding. Radishes are generally hardy and can tolerate frost, making them a good choice for a fall or winter garden. The edible parts of the radish plant are the root and the leaves. The root can be eaten raw, cooked, or pickled, while the leaves can be used in salads or cooked like other leafy greens. After harvest, the roots can be stored in a cool and dark place, such as a root cellar, to prolong their shelf life. Radishes have a number of uses, both in the garden and beyond. In the garden, they can be used as a companion plant to deter pests and improve the health of other plants. In addition to their use in cooking, radishes have also been used medicinally, with some evidence suggesting that they may have anti-inflammatory and digestive health benefits. Radishes are also a valuable food source for wildlife, providing a source of nutrition for birds and small mammals. They are a popular food for bees and other pollinators, and can help to attract these beneficial insects to the garden. Show

Edit
Winter Savory Winter Savory
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Winter_savory
true
Medium
Dry, Moist
Full sun
6-11
Shrubs
Light (sandy), Medium
Lamiaceae or labiatae
0.4
Bohnenkraut, winterbohnenkraut, bergbohnenkraut
Leaves
https://pfaf.org/User/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Satureja montana
Show

Edit
Summer savory Summer savory
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Summer_savory
true
Dry, Moist
Full sun
5-9
Light (sandy), Medium
Lamiaceae
0.3
Bohnenkraut, gartenbohnenkraut
Leaves
Annual
https://pfaf.org/User/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Satureja hortensis
Show

Edit
Borage Borage
6-9
Annual
Full sun, Partial sun/shade
Dry, Moist
Light (sandy), Medium, Heavy (clay)
0.6
Herbs
Flowers, Leaves
Seed - direct sow
At last frost
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Borage
Medium
Common borage, Cool-tankard, Tailwort, Starflower
Boraginaceae
Borretsch
60cm
5-15 days
21°c (70°f)
Oil
https://pfaf.org/User/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Borago officinalis
Borago
5
-2
Borage, also known as Borago officinalis, is a herb native to the Mediterranean region. It is a hairy, annual herb that grows to a height of about 60 cm, with blue, star-shaped flowers and large hairy leaves. The plant is easily differentiated from similar plants by its hairy stems and leaves, and its bright blue flowers. Borage prefers well-drained soil and full sun, and grows best in warm temperatures. It is a fast-growing plant, and can be easily cultivated by direct sowing or transplanting seedlings. Borage is not winter hardy, and should be grown as an annual in most climates. The leaves and flowers of borage are edible, and can be used in salads, soups, and other dishes. The leaves have a cucumber-like flavor, while the flowers are slightly sweet. The edible parts of the plant can be stored by freezing or drying. Borage has several medicinal uses, and has been used traditionally to treat a variety of ailments, including respiratory problems, skin irritation, and anxiety. It is also a good source of nutrients, including calcium, potassium, and vitamin C. In addition to its medicinal uses, borage has value as a companion plant in the garden. It attracts pollinators, such as bees and butterflies, and can be used as a natural pest deterrent. #### Propagation Direct sow early spring when temperatures reach 21°C (70°F). Best sown directly, as borage develops a delicate taproot. #### Links [Borage @ West Coast Seeds](https://www.westcoastseeds.com/products/borage) Show

Edit
White Mustard White Mustard
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/White_mustard
true
Fast
Moist
Full sun, Partial sun/shade
5-9
Light (sandy), Medium, Heavy (clay)
Brassicaceae or cruciferae
0.6
Weißer senf
Leaves, Seed
Oil
Annual
https://pfaf.org/User/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Sinapis alba
Show

Edit
Cucamelon Cucamelon
Annual
Full sun
Vines
Seed - direct sow, Seed - transplant
At last frost
3-4 weeks before last frost
1 week after last frost
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Melothria_scabra
Cucamelon, Mexikanische mini-gurke
60-70
23cm
6.5-7.0
15-30°c (60-85°f)
Mouse melon
Cucurbitaceae
-3
67
Corn, Sunflowers and any other high growing plant, can act as a trellis. #### Propagation Direct sow when soil temperatures reach 15°C (60°F). Plant inside 3-4 weeks before planting outside, and use bottom-heat to help germination. Transplant when plant develop their third true leaf. #### Links [Cucamelon @ West Coast Seeds](https://www.westcoastseeds.com/products/cucamelon) Show

Edit
Nane Nane
Nana-minze
Show

Edit