Permaculture companion plants for Comfrey

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Image Name Data Description Actions
Apple Apple
3-8
Perennial
Full sun, Partial sun/shade
Moist
Light (sandy), Medium, Heavy (clay)
Deciduous
10.0
Trees
Animal feed, Attracts insects, Hedgerow
True
Fruit
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apple
Oil
https://pfaf.org/user/plant.aspx?LatinName=Malus+domestica
Malus
Appel
Æble
Rosaceae
An apple is an edible fruit produced by an apple tree (Malus domestica). Apple trees are cultivated worldwide and are the most widely grown species in the genus Malus. The tree originated in Central Asia, where its wild ancestor, Malus sieversii, is still found today. Apples have been grown for thousands of years in Asia and Europe and were brought to North America by European colonists. Apples have religious and mythological significance in many cultures, including Norse, Greek, and European Christian tradition. Apples grown from seed tend to be very different from those of their parents, and the resultant fruit frequently lacks desired characteristics. Generally, apple cultivars are propagated by clonal grafting onto rootstocks. Apple trees grown without rootstocks tend to be larger and much slower to fruit after planting. Rootstocks are used to control the speed of growth and the size of the resulting tree, allowing for easier harvesting. There are more than 7,500 known cultivars of apples. Different cultivars are bred for various tastes and uses, including cooking, eating raw, and cider production. Trees and fruit are prone to a number of fungal, bacterial, and pest problems, which can be controlled by a number of organic and non-organic means. In 2010, the fruit's genome was sequenced as part of research on disease control and selective breeding in apple production. Worldwide production of apples in 2018 was 86 million tonnes, with China accounting for nearly half of the total. From [Wikipedia](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apple) Show

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Peach Peach
5-9
Perennial
Full sun
Moist
Light (sandy), Medium, Heavy (clay)
6
Trees
true
Flowers, Fruit, Seed
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peach
Fast
Flowering peach, ornamental peach, common peach
Rosaceae
Pfirsich, bergpfirsich, tellerpfirsich, saturnpfirsich, weinbergpfirsich
Oil
https://pfaf.org/User/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Prunus persica
The peach, scientifically known as Prunus persica, is a deciduous tree native to northwest China. It typically grows to be about 10-30 feet tall, with a short trunk and a rounded crown. The leaves are oval-shaped, with serrated edges and a glossy, dark green color. The flowers are pink and white, with five petals each. Peaches are known for their fuzzy, peach-colored skin and juicy, sweet flesh. They can be eaten fresh, canned, or cooked into dishes such as pies and cobblers. The edible parts of the peach include the flesh and the seed, which contains a small kernel that can be ground into flour. Peaches can be stored after harvest by keeping them in a cool, dry place. Peaches prefer well-draining, loamy soil and full sun. They can be grown in a variety of climates, but do best in warm, temperate regions. To cultivate peaches successfully, growers may need to provide support for the trees, prune them regularly, and protect them from pests and diseases. Peaches are generally winter hardy, but can be damaged by frost. In addition to being eaten fresh, peaches have a variety of uses. The flowers can be used in herbal teas, and the leaves can be used to make a yellow dye. The wood of the tree can be used for smoking meat, and the kernels can be used to make oil. Peaches are also a valuable food source for wildlife, attracting birds, squirrels, and other animals. Show

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Borage Borage
6-9
Annual
Full sun, Partial sun/shade
Dry, Moist
Light (sandy), Medium, Heavy (clay)
0.6
Herbs
Flowers, Leaves
Seed - direct sow
At last frost
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Borage
Medium
Common borage, Cool-tankard, Tailwort, Starflower
Boraginaceae
Borretsch
60cm
5-15 days
21°c (70°f)
Oil
https://pfaf.org/User/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Borago officinalis
Borago
5
-2
Borage, also known as Borago officinalis, is a herb native to the Mediterranean region. It is a hairy, annual herb that grows to a height of about 60 cm, with blue, star-shaped flowers and large hairy leaves. The plant is easily differentiated from similar plants by its hairy stems and leaves, and its bright blue flowers. Borage prefers well-drained soil and full sun, and grows best in warm temperatures. It is a fast-growing plant, and can be easily cultivated by direct sowing or transplanting seedlings. Borage is not winter hardy, and should be grown as an annual in most climates. The leaves and flowers of borage are edible, and can be used in salads, soups, and other dishes. The leaves have a cucumber-like flavor, while the flowers are slightly sweet. The edible parts of the plant can be stored by freezing or drying. Borage has several medicinal uses, and has been used traditionally to treat a variety of ailments, including respiratory problems, skin irritation, and anxiety. It is also a good source of nutrients, including calcium, potassium, and vitamin C. In addition to its medicinal uses, borage has value as a companion plant in the garden. It attracts pollinators, such as bees and butterflies, and can be used as a natural pest deterrent. #### Propagation Direct sow early spring when temperatures reach 21°C (70°F). Best sown directly, as borage develops a delicate taproot. #### Links [Borage @ West Coast Seeds](https://www.westcoastseeds.com/products/borage) Show

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Sweet cherry Sweet cherry
3-7
Perennial
Full sun, Partial sun/shade
Moist
Light (sandy), Medium, Heavy (clay)
Deciduous
18.0
Trees
Animal feed, Attracts insects, Hedgerow
true
Fruit, Seed
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prunus_avium
Fast
Sweet cherry
Rosaceae
Süßkirsche
true
https://pfaf.org/User/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Prunus avium
183
The sweet cherry, Prunus avium, is a fruit-bearing tree that is native to Europe, western Asia, and northern Africa. It typically grows to a height of 15-30 feet, with a spread of 20-25 feet, and has a rounded crown. The leaves are oblong-shaped, with serrated edges and a glossy dark green color. The flowers are white or pale pink, with five petals, and appear in clusters in the spring before the leaves. The fruit, which is the sweet cherry, is a small, round drupe, with a smooth, dark red or black skin and a juicy, sweet flesh. In terms of growing conditions, the sweet cherry prefers well-drained, fertile soil and full sun exposure. It can be grown in a variety of climates, but may require protection from frost in harsh climates. To cultivate the sweet cherry successfully, a grower may need to prune the tree to maintain its shape, provide adequate water and fertilizer, and protect the tree from pests and diseases. The sweet cherry is edible and can be eaten fresh or used in a variety of culinary dishes. The fruit can be stored in the refrigerator for a few days or preserved by freezing or canning. The sweet cherry is also valued for its medicinal properties, as the fruit and leaves have been used in traditional medicine to treat a variety of ailments. In terms of its value for wildlife, the sweet cherry provides food for a variety of animals, including birds, squirrels, and other small mammals. It also provides shelter and habitat for these animals. Show

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Sour cherry Sour cherry
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prunus_cerasus
true
Moist
Full sun, Partial sun/shade
3-7
Trees
Light (sandy), Medium, Heavy (clay)
Rosaceae
6.0
Sauerkirsche
true
Oil, tea
Fruit, Seed
Animal feed, Attracts insects, Hedgerow, Wind breaker
Perennial
Deciduous
https://pfaf.org/User/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Prunus cerasus
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Rose Rose
2
Perennial
Full sun, Partial sun/shade
Deciduous
Shrubs
Animal feed, Attracts insects, Hedgerow, Wind breaker
True
Fruit
True
Rosaceae
Show

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Black raspberry Black raspberry
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rubus_occidentalis
true
Moist
Full sun, Partial sun/shade
3-7
Shrubs
Light (sandy), Medium, Heavy (clay)
Rosaceae
3.0
Schwarze himbeere
true
Tea
Fruit, Stem
Animal feed, Attracts insects, Hedgerow, Poultry forage
Perennial
Deciduous
https://pfaf.org/User/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Rubus occidentalis
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Red raspberry Red raspberry
3-8
Perennial
Full sun, Partial sun/shade
Moist
Light (sandy), Medium, Heavy (clay)
Deciduous
2.0
Shrubs
Animal feed, Attracts insects, Hedgerow, Poultry forage
True
Fruit, Root, Stem
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rubus_idaeus
Medium
American red raspberry, Grayleaf red raspberry
Rosaceae
Himbeere
True
https://pfaf.org/User/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Rubus idaeus
Framboos
Hindbær
Raspberry (Rubus idaeus) is a plant native to Europe, Asia, and North America. It is a perennial plant that grows upright with canes that can reach up to 5 feet in height. The leaves are green and compound, with 3-5 leaflets on each stem. The flowers are white or pink and have five petals. The fruit of the raspberry plant is a red, edible drupe that is about the size of a small marble. Raspberry plants prefer well-drained soil and full sun, but they can also tolerate partial shade. To cultivate raspberries successfully, a grower may need to provide support for the canes, as well as prune them regularly to promote new growth. Raspberries are typically propagated through root cuttings or by dividing the root system. Raspberries are edible and the fruit can be eaten fresh or used in a variety of dishes. The fruit can also be frozen or canned for later use. In addition to their use as a food, raspberries have been used medicinally for their astringent and anti-inflammatory properties. The leaves of the raspberry plant can also be brewed into a tea. Raspberry plants are valued for their fruit, but they also provide habitat and food for a variety of wildlife, including birds and small mammals. The plants can be used as a natural form of pest control, as they attract beneficial insects that prey on pest insects. Show

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Red mulberry Red mulberry
4-9
Perennial
Full sun, Partial sun/shade
Moist
Light (sandy), Medium, Heavy (clay)
15.0
Trees
true
Fruit, Leaves
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Morus_rubra
Common mulberry, white mulberry
Moraceae
Rote maulbeere
https://pfaf.org/User/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Morus rubra
1.5
The Red mulberry, Morus rubra, is native to the eastern United States and Canada. It is a deciduous tree that can grow to a height of up to 80 feet. The leaves are dark green and have a rough texture. The tree produces small, greenish-white flowers in the spring, which develop into clusters of red berries in the summer. The Red mulberry is often differentiated from other mulberry species by its smaller leaves and red berries. It prefers well-drained, moist soil and partial to full sun exposure. It is winter hardy and does not require any special care or maintenance. The fruit of the Red mulberry is edible and can be eaten fresh or used in cooking and baking. The berries can be stored in the refrigerator for up to a week. The tree also has a number of medicinal uses, including as a laxative and for treating sore throat and bronchitis. In terms of wildlife, the Red mulberry is a valuable food source for a variety of birds and mammals. Its fruit is a popular food source for birds such as robins, mockingbirds, and blue jays. The tree also provides habitat for birds and small mammals. Show

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Black walnut Black walnut
4-9
Perennial
Full sun
Moist
Light (sandy), Medium, Heavy (clay)
30.0
Tall trees
Animal feed, Wind breaker, Wood
true
Sap, Seed
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Juglans_nigra
Fast
Juglandaceae
Schwarznuss
true
true
Oil
https://pfaf.org/User/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Juglans nigra
Black walnut is a large deciduous tree native to North America, growing up to 100 feet tall. It has a straight trunk with a rough, deeply furrowed bark, and a canopy of large, pinnately compound leaves with 15-23 lance-shaped leaflets. The tree produces large, greenish-white flowers in the spring, followed by large, spherical fruits containing a single, edible nut. Black walnuts are prized for their distinctive, rich flavor and are commonly used in baking and cooking. The nuts can be harvested in the fall and can be stored in their shells for several months. Black walnuts prefer deep, well-drained soils and can tolerate a wide range of soil pH levels. They can be grown successfully in full sun to partial shade, and they are relatively drought-tolerant once established. Black walnuts are not particularly winter hardy, and they can be damaged by heavy ice and snow. In addition to their culinary uses, black walnuts have a number of other uses. The wood is highly prized for its durability and attractive grain, and is used in furniture making and other woodworking applications. The tree's leaves, bark, and nuts are also used in herbal medicine for their astringent and tonic properties. Black walnuts are also valued for their ability to improve soil health, as their deep taproots help to break up compacted soils and their fallen leaves add organic matter to the soil. Black walnuts are also an important food source for wildlife, including squirrels, birds, and deer. The tree provides shelter and nesting sites for a variety of animals, and its fallen leaves and nuts provide food for many species. Show

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Black mulberry Black mulberry
5-9
Perennial
Full sun, Partial sun/shade
Moist
Light (sandy), Medium, Heavy (clay)
Deciduous
10.0
Trees
Animal feed, Poultry forage
true
Fruit
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Morus_nigra
Slow
Moraceae
Schwarze maulbeere
true
https://pfaf.org/User/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Morus nigra
The black mulberry (Morus nigra) is a species of mulberry native to southwestern Asia, including Iran, Afghanistan, and Pakistan. It is a small to medium-sized tree that grows to be about 20-30 feet tall and has a round, dense canopy. The leaves of the black mulberry are dark green and glossy on the top, and paler and slightly hairy on the bottom. The tree produces small, white flowers in the spring, which are followed by black, juicy fruits in the summer. The black mulberry is relatively fast-growing and can reach its full size in about 10-15 years. It prefers well-drained, fertile soil and full sun, but can tolerate partial shade. It is also winter hardy and can withstand temperatures down to about -10°F. The fruits of the black mulberry are edible and can be eaten fresh or used in jams, jellies, and other preserves. They can also be dried and stored for later use. The leaves of the black mulberry can be fed to silkworms, and the wood of the tree is strong and durable, making it suitable for a variety of uses. In addition to its edible fruits, the black mulberry has several other uses. Its leaves can be used as a natural fertilizer, and the tree can provide shade and wind protection in gardens and farms. The black mulberry is also a popular food source for birds and other wildlife. Show

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White mulberry White mulberry
3-9
Perennial
Full sun, Partial sun/shade
Moist
Light (sandy), Medium, Heavy (clay)
Deciduous
18
Trees
Animal feed, Fiber, Hedgerow, Poultry forage, Wind breaker, Dye
true
Fruit, Inner bark, Leaves
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Morus_alba
Medium
Common mulberry
Moraceae
Weiße maulbeere
true
Weed potential
https://pfaf.org/User/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Morus alba
The white mulberry is a deciduous tree native to northern China, Korea, and Japan. It has large, heart-shaped leaves and small, white or pale pink flowers that grow in clusters. The tree can grow to be quite large, up to 50 feet tall, and it is fast-growing. White mulberry trees can be differentiated from other mulberry trees by their white, rather than dark purple, fruit. White mulberry trees prefer well-draining soil and full sun, but can tolerate partial shade. They are drought-tolerant and can thrive in a variety of soil types. In colder climates, they may need to be protected from frost during the winter months. The fruit of the white mulberry tree is edible and is often used to make jams, jellies, and wines. The fruit can be stored by freezing or canning. Young leaves can also be eaten. White mulberry trees are valued for their fast growth and ability to provide shade. They can be used for wind protection and as a ground cover. The leaves of the tree are sometimes used as animal feed. In some cultures, the bark of the white mulberry tree is used medicinally. Show

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Potato Potato
3-10
Perennial
Full sun
Moist
Light (sandy), Medium, Heavy (clay)
1.0
Root
Seed - direct sow
April
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Potato
Irish potato, Andigena
Solanaceae
Kartoffel
https://pfaf.org/User/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Solanum tuberosum
12 inches
Potato (Solanum tuberosum) is a herbaceous perennial plant that is native to the Andean region of South America. It is a member of the nightshade family (Solanaceae) and is closely related to other nightshades such as tomatoes, eggplants, and bell peppers. The potato plant has a bushy growth habit and can grow to heights of 30-150 cm depending on the variety. The leaves are large, heart-shaped, and alternate along the stem. The flowers are white or purple and have five petals. The plant produces small green berries that contain numerous seeds, but most varieties of potatoes are propagated vegetatively from tubers rather than from seeds. The edible part of the potato plant is the tuber, which is an underground stem that is modified for food storage. Potatoes come in a wide range of shapes, sizes, and colors including white, yellow, red, and purple. The size and shape of the tuber depends on the variety, with some varieties producing small, round tubers and others producing large, elongated tubers. Potatoes grow best in well-draining, fertile soils in a sunny location with a pH of 4.5-6.0. They require regular watering and should be planted in a location with good air circulation to prevent fungal diseases. Potatoes are typically planted from tubers that have been treated with a fungicide to prevent disease and are spaced 25-30 cm apart in rows that are 75-90 cm apart. The tubers will begin to form in the soil around 6-8 weeks after planting and can be harvested when they reach the desired size. Potatoes are a versatile and nutritious food source that is rich in vitamins, minerals, and fiber. The tubers are eaten cooked, baked, fried, or mashed, and the leaves and flowers of the plant can also be eaten. Potatoes can be stored in a cool, dry, and dark place for several months. Potatoes have a number of uses beyond their value as a food source. The tubers can be used as seed potatoes for planting, and the leaves and stems can be used as a natural insecticide or as mulch in the garden. In some parts of the world, potatoes are also used for their medicinal properties. Potatoes are a valuable food source for a variety of wildlife, including deer, rabbits, and squirrels. The flowers of the potato plant are also a source of nectar for bees and other pollinators. Show

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Common Hazelnut Common Hazelnut
4-8
Perennial
Full sun, Partial sun/shade
Moist
Light (sandy), Medium, Heavy (clay)
Deciduous
6.0
Trees
Animal feed, Weaving material, Hedgerow, Wind breaker
true
Seed
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corylus_avellana
Medium
Common filbert, european filbert, harry lauder's walking stick, corkscrew hazel, hazel
Betulaceae
Haselnuss
true
Oil
https://pfaf.org/User/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Corylus avellana
The Common Hazelnut, also known as Corylus avellana, is a deciduous shrub native to Europe and Asia. It typically grows to be 3-10 feet tall and has a rounded, spreading form. The leaves are dark green and oval-shaped, with serrated edges and a hairy undersurface. In the spring, the plant produces clusters of small, reddish-purple flowers. The flowers are followed by edible nuts encased in a green, spiny husk. The Common Hazelnut grows best in full sun to partial shade and prefers well-drained, moist soil. It is winter hardy and can tolerate a wide range of temperatures. To cultivate the plant successfully, a grower may need to provide it with regular watering and pruning to maintain its shape and encourage nut production. The edible nuts of the Common Hazelnut can be harvested in the fall, after the husks have split open. The nuts can be stored in a cool, dry place for several months. They can be eaten raw or roasted, and are often used in baking and confectionery. The nuts are also rich in vitamins and minerals, and have been used medicinally to treat a variety of ailments. In addition to its culinary and medicinal uses, the Common Hazelnut is also valued for its utility. The wood of the plant is strong and flexible, and has been used for making baskets, fishing rods, and other implements. The plant can also be used for wind protection and as a ground cover. It is also attractive to wildlife, providing food and shelter for a variety of birds and small mammals. Show

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Gooseberry Gooseberry
4-8
Perennial
Full sun, Partial sun/shade
Moist
Light (sandy), Medium, Heavy (clay)
Deciduous
1.2
Shrubs
Animal feed, Attracts insects, Hedgerow, Poultry forage
true
Fruit, Leaves
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ribes_uva-crispa
Medium
European gooseberry, american gooseberry, cu li, egres, fuge, gigadze, groseille a maquareau, groseillier, grosella blanca, grosellero, kikerberi, kryhovnik, maru suguri, stachelbeere, uva spina
Grossulariaceae
true
true
https://pfaf.org/User/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Ribes uva-crispa
The gooseberry is a plant native to Europe, northern Africa, and western Asia. It is a shrub that typically grows to 1-2 meters in height, with spiny stems and green leaves that are oval in shape. The plant produces small green or red berries that are edible. The gooseberry plant prefers to grow in full sun and well-draining soil. It can tolerate a variety of soil types but prefers a neutral to slightly acidic pH. Growers may need to prune the plant regularly to maintain its shape and encourage fruit production. The plant is winter hardy, meaning it can withstand cold temperatures without damage. The berries of the gooseberry plant are edible and can be eaten fresh or used in cooking. They are high in vitamin C and can be stored in the refrigerator for several days after harvest. The plant has a number of uses, including medicinal uses such as treating diarrhea and dysentery. The plant's leaves can also be used as a natural insect repellent. In addition to its uses for humans, the gooseberry plant is also valuable for wildlife. The plant provides food and shelter for a variety of animals, including birds, insects, and small mammals. The plant's spiny stems also provide protection for nesting birds. Overall, the gooseberry is a versatile and valuable plant for gardeners and farmers. Show

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Goumi Goumi
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elaeagnus_multiflora
true
Medium
Dry, Moist
Full sun, Partial sun/shade
5-9
Trees
Cherry elaeagnus, cherry silverberry, gumi, natsugumi, essbare ölweide, rote sommer-ölweide, langstielige ölweide, japanische ölweide, cibie, longipe bush, mupan-hsia
Light (sandy), Medium, Heavy (clay)
Elaeagnaceae
3.0
Reichblütige ölweide
true
Fruit, Seed
Animal feed, Attracts insects, Hedgerow, Nitrogen fixer, Poultry forage, Wind breaker
Perennial
Deciduous
https://pfaf.org/User/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Elaeagnus multiflora
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Goji Goji
6-9
Perennial
Full sun, Partial sun/shade
Moist
Light (sandy), Medium, Heavy (clay)
Deciduous
2.5
Shrubs
Hedgerow, Wind breaker
true
Fruit, Leaves
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lycium_barbarum
Medium
Goji berry, wolfberry, box thorn, matrimony vine, chinese matrimony vine, chirchitta, chirmethi, duke of argyle's teaplant, ganger, gangro, gou qi zi, kangu, khatai, kichar, kutyafa, licium, morali, ning xia gou qi, wolfberry also known as: baies de goji, baies de lycium, barberry matrimony vine, chinese boxthorn, di gu pi, épine du christ, fructus lycii, fructus lycii berry, fruit de lycium, goji chinois, goji de l’himalaya, goji juice, jus de goji, kuko, lichi, licium barbarum, litchi, lychee, lyciet, lyciet commun, lyciet de barbarie, lycii berries, lycii fruit, lycium fruit
Solanaceae
true
Weed potential
https://pfaf.org/User/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Lycium barbarum
Goji (Lycium barbarum), or wolfberry (Chinese: 枸杞; pinyin: gǒuqǐ), is a flowering plant native to Asia, specifically the regions of China, Mongolia, and Tibet. It is a woody perennial that can grow up to 10 feet in height and has green leaves that are elongated and somewhat hairy. The flowers are small and white, and the fruit is a bright red, oblong berry. It's closely related to Lycium chinense, but the fruits can be distinguished by differences in taste and sugar content. In terms of growing conditions, goji plants prefer well-draining soil and full sun. They are drought-tolerant and can tolerate a wide range of temperatures, making them well-suited to many different climates. However, they do require some protection from strong winds, as their branches can be brittle and easily broken. The plant parts are called by the Latin names lycii fructus (fruit), herba lycii (leaves), etc., in modern official pharmacopeias. Goji berries are edible and are often used in traditional Chinese, Korean, Vietnamese, and Japanese medicine, since at least the 3rd century CE. They can be eaten fresh or dried, and are said to have a sweet and slightly sour taste. The berries can be stored for long periods of time, either in a cool, dry place or in the freezer. In terms of their uses, goji berries are often used in herbal remedies to boost the immune system and improve overall health. They are also said to have anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. The berries can also be used in cooking, either fresh or dried, and are often added to teas, smoothies, and other beverages. Goji plants are also valued for their attractiveness to wildlife, including birds and insects. The berries are a favorite food of many species, and the plants provide habitat and shelter for a variety of creatures. Show

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