Permaculture companion plants for Stinging Nettle

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Apricot Apricot
4-8
Perennial
Full sun, Partial sun/shade
Moist
Light (sandy), Medium
Deciduous
9.0
Trees
Animal feed, Attracts insects, Wildlife habitat
true
Fruit, Seed
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prunus_armeniaca
Medium
Rosaceae
true
Oil
https://pfaf.org/User/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Prunus armeniaca
China North-Central, China South-Central, Inner Mongolia, Kazakhstan, Kirgizstan, Kriti, Manchuria, Qinghai, Uzbekistan, Xinjiang
Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Bulgaria, California, Central European Rus, Colorado, Corse, Cyprus, East European Russia, East Himalaya, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Idaho, Illinois, Iowa, Iran, Italy, Kansas, Korea, Krym, Lebanon-Syria, Libya, Michigan, Missouri, Montana, Morocco, New Mexico, New South Wales, North Caucasus, Oregon, Pakistan, Pennsylvania, Portugal, Queensland, Romania, Sardegna, South Australia, South European Russi, Tadzhikistan, Transcaucasus, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkey-in-Europe, Turkmenistan, Ukraine, Utah, Virginia, Washington, West Himalaya, Yugoslavia
https://powo.science.kew.org/taxon/urn:lsid:ipni.org:names:729463-1
The apricot is a tree native to China and Central Asia. It typically grows to be about 20-30 feet tall and has a spreading, round canopy. The leaves are oval-shaped and about 2-4 inches long, with a serrated edge and a glossy green surface. The flowers are white or pink and have five petals. The fruit is a drupe, similar in appearance to a peach, with a smooth, orange skin and a fleshy interior. Apricots are known for their sweet flavor and are often used in jams, jellies, and other preserves. The fruit can also be eaten fresh or dried. The seed, or pit, of the apricot contains a small amount of cyanide and should not be eaten. Apricots prefer a warm, sunny climate and well-draining soil. They are sensitive to frost and can be damaged by cold temperatures. To successfully grow apricots, they should be planted in an area with full sun exposure and watered regularly. Apricots have a number of uses beyond their delicious fruit. The wood of the tree is often used for smoking meats, and the leaves can be used as a natural insecticide. In traditional medicine, apricot oil has been used to treat a variety of ailments. Show

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Sweet cherry Sweet cherry
3-7
Perennial
Full sun, Partial sun/shade
Moist
Light (sandy), Medium, Heavy (clay)
Deciduous
18.0
Trees
Animal feed, Attracts insects, Hedgerow, Wildlife habitat
true
Fruit, Seed
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prunus_avium
Fast
Sweet cherry
Rosaceae
Süßkirsche
https://pfaf.org/User/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Prunus avium
183
Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Austria, Belarus, Belgium, Bulgaria, Corse, Cyprus, Czechoslovakia, Denmark, France, Germany, Great Britain, Greece, Hungary, Iran, Ireland, Italy, Krym, Libya, Morocco, Netherlands, North Caucasus, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Sardegna, Sicilia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Transcaucasus, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkey-in-Europe, Ukraine, Yugoslavia
Arizona, Baleares, Baltic States, British Columbia, California, Central European Rus, Connecticut, Delaware, District of Columbia, East European Russia, East Himalaya, Finland, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Kazakhstan, Kentucky, Korea, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, New Brunswick, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New South Wales, New York, New Zealand North, New Zealand South, North Carolina, Nova Scotia, Ohio, Ontario, Oregon, Pakistan, Pennsylvania, Rhode I., South Australia, South Carolina, South European Russi, Tadzhikistan, Tennessee, Turkmenistan, Utah, Victoria, Virginia, Washington, West Himalaya, West Virginia, Wyoming
3
https://powo.science.kew.org/taxon/urn:lsid:ipni.org:names:30093848-2
The sweet cherry, Prunus avium, is a fruit-bearing tree that is native to Europe, western Asia, and northern Africa. It typically grows to a height of 15-30 feet, with a spread of 20-25 feet, and has a rounded crown. The leaves are oblong-shaped, with serrated edges and a glossy dark green color. The flowers are white or pale pink, with five petals, and appear in clusters in the spring before the leaves. The fruit, which is the sweet cherry, is a small, round drupe, with a smooth, dark red or black skin and a juicy, sweet flesh. In terms of growing conditions, the sweet cherry prefers well-drained, fertile soil and full sun exposure. It can be grown in a variety of climates, but may require protection from frost in harsh climates. To cultivate the sweet cherry successfully, a grower may need to prune the tree to maintain its shape, provide adequate water and fertilizer, and protect the tree from pests and diseases. The sweet cherry is edible and can be eaten fresh or used in a variety of culinary dishes. The fruit can be stored in the refrigerator for a few days or preserved by freezing or canning. The sweet cherry is also valued for its medicinal properties, as the fruit and leaves have been used in traditional medicine to treat a variety of ailments. In terms of its value for wildlife, the sweet cherry provides food for a variety of animals, including birds, squirrels, and other small mammals. It also provides shelter and habitat for these animals. Show

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Sour cherry Sour cherry
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prunus_cerasus
true
Moist
Full sun, Partial sun/shade
3-7
Trees
Light (sandy), Medium, Heavy (clay)
Rosaceae
6.0
Sauerkirsche
Oil, tea
Fruit, Seed
Animal feed, Attracts insects, Hedgerow, Wind breaker, Wildlife habitat
Perennial
Deciduous
https://pfaf.org/User/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Prunus cerasus
North Caucasus
Afghanistan, Alaska, Argentina South, Austria, Baltic States, Belgium, British Columbia, Bulgaria, California, Central European Rus, Connecticut, Czechoslovakia, Delaware, District of Columbia, East European Russia, East Himalaya, France, Georgia, Germany, Great Britain, Hungary, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Iran, Ireland, Irkutsk, Italy, Kansas, Kazakhstan, Kentucky, Korea, Madeira, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, New Brunswick, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New South Wales, New York, New Zealand North, New Zealand South, North Carolina, Nova Scotia, Ohio, Ontario, Oregon, Pakistan, Pennsylvania, Poland, Portugal, Prince Edward I., Québec, Rhode I., Sardegna, Sicilia, South European Russi, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Tadzhikistan, Transcaucasus, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Ukraine, Uzbekistan, Vermont, Virginia, Washington, West Himalaya, West Siberia, West Virginia, Xinjiang, Yugoslavia
https://powo.science.kew.org/taxon/urn:lsid:ipni.org:names:729574-1
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Peach Peach
5-9
Perennial
Full sun
Moist
Light (sandy), Medium, Heavy (clay)
6
Trees
true
Flowers, Fruit, Seed
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peach
Fast
Flowering peach, ornamental peach, common peach
Rosaceae
Pfirsich, bergpfirsich, tellerpfirsich, saturnpfirsich, weinbergpfirsich
Oil
https://pfaf.org/User/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Prunus persica
China North-Central
Afghanistan, Alabama, Argentina Northwest, Arizona, Arkansas, Assam, Baleares, Bulgaria, California, Cape Verde, China South-Central, China Southeast, Colorado, Connecticut, Corse, Cyprus, Delaware, District of Columbia, East European Russia, East Himalaya, Ecuador, El Salvador, Ethiopia, Florida, France, Free State, Georgia, Greece, Hungary, Idaho, Illinois, India, Indiana, Iowa, Iran, Italy, Japan, Kansas, Kazakhstan, Kentucky, Kenya, Kirgizstan, Korea, Kriti, Krym, KwaZulu-Natal, Laos, Libya, Louisiana, Maine, Marianas, Maryland, Massachusetts, Mauritius, Michigan, Mississippi, Missouri, New Jersey, New Mexico, New South Wales, New York, New Zealand North, North Carolina, North Caucasus, Northern Provinces, Nova Scotia, Ohio, Oklahoma, Ontario, Oregon, Pakistan, Pennsylvania, Portugal, Queensland, Rhode I., Rodrigues, Romania, Réunion, Sardegna, South Australia, South Carolina, South European Russi, St.Helena, Switzerland, Tadzhikistan, Tennessee, Texas, Transcaucasus, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Ukraine, Utah, Uzbekistan, Vietnam, Virginia, West Himalaya, West Virginia, Wisconsin
3
https://powo.science.kew.org/taxon/urn:lsid:ipni.org:names:1212858-2
The peach, scientifically known as Prunus persica, is a deciduous tree native to northwest China. It typically grows to be about 10-30 feet tall, with a short trunk and a rounded crown. The leaves are oval-shaped, with serrated edges and a glossy, dark green color. The flowers are pink and white, with five petals each. Peaches are known for their fuzzy, peach-colored skin and juicy, sweet flesh. They can be eaten fresh, canned, or cooked into dishes such as pies and cobblers. The edible parts of the peach include the flesh and the seed, which contains a small kernel that can be ground into flour. Peaches can be stored after harvest by keeping them in a cool, dry place. Peaches prefer well-draining, loamy soil and full sun. They can be grown in a variety of climates, but do best in warm, temperate regions. To cultivate peaches successfully, growers may need to provide support for the trees, prune them regularly, and protect them from pests and diseases. Peaches are generally winter hardy, but can be damaged by frost. In addition to being eaten fresh, peaches have a variety of uses. The flowers can be used in herbal teas, and the leaves can be used to make a yellow dye. The wood of the tree can be used for smoking meat, and the kernels can be used to make oil. Peaches are also a valuable food source for wildlife, attracting birds, squirrels, and other animals. Show

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Nectarine Nectarine
4-8
Perennial
Full sun
Moist
Light (sandy), Medium, Heavy (clay)
Deciduous
6.0
Trees
Animal feed, Attracts insects, Hedgerow, Wildlife habitat
True
Flowers, Fruit, Seed
Rosaceae
Nektarine
Oil
https://pfaf.org/User/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Prunus persica nucipersica
Nectarine
Nektarin
3
Nectarine (Prunus persica nucipersica) is a plant that is a type of stone fruit. It is native to China and is closely related to the peach. Nectarines are similar in appearance to peaches, but have smooth skin rather than fuzzy skin. They can range in size from small to large and are typically round or oval in shape. Nectarines have green or red leaves and white or pink flowers. The stems of the plant are generally thin and have thorns. Nectarines can grow to be quite large, reaching heights of up to 8 meters. They grow best in warm, sunny climates and well-drained soil. To cultivate nectarines successfully, a grower will need to provide the plant with plenty of sunlight and water. They may also need to prune the plant to maintain its shape and encourage new growth. Nectarines are edible and the fruit can be eaten fresh or cooked. The edible parts of the fruit can be stored in a cool, dry place after harvest. Nectarines have several uses. In addition to being eaten fresh or cooked, they can also be used to make jams, jellies, and other preserves. They can also be dried and used as a snack. In addition to their culinary uses, nectarines have been used medicinally for their high vitamin and mineral content. They are also valued for their ability to attract wildlife, such as birds and bees, to the garden. Show

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Horseradish Horseradish
4-9
Perennial
Full sun, Partial sun/shade
Moist
Light (sandy), Medium, Heavy (clay)
Deciduous
0.7-1.5m
Herbs
Ground cover
True
Leaves, Root, Seed
Seed - transplant, Seed - direct sow, Division
At last frost date
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Horseradish
Fast
Red cole, Cochlearia armoracia
Brassicaceae
Meerrettich
https://pfaf.org/User/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Armoracia rusticana
5.5-7.0
Europe, South European Russi, Ukraine
Tap
60cm
55
True
Roots
8-12weeks before last frost
7-23°c (45-75°f)
7-25 days
20cm (8″) / 40-50cm (16-20″)
True
Mierik, Mierikswortel
Peberrod
Albania, Altay, Austria, Baltic States, Belarus, Belgium, British Columbia, Bulgaria, Buryatiya, California, Central European Rus, China North-Central, China Southeast, Colorado, Connecticut, Czechoslovakia, Denmark, East European Russia, Finland, France, Germany, Great Britain, Hungary, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Kamchatka, Kazakhstan, Kentucky, Kirgizstan, Korea, Krasnoyarsk, Maine, Manchuria, Manitoba, Marianas, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Netherlands, New Brunswick, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, New Zealand North, New Zealand South, North Carolina, North Caucasus, North Dakota, North European Russi, Northwest European R, Norway, Nova Scotia, Ohio, Ontario, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Poland, Primorye, Prince Edward I., Québec, Rhode I., Romania, Sakhalin, Saskatchewan, Sicilia, South Dakota, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Tadzhikistan, Tennessee, Transcaucasus, Turkey, Turkey-in-Europe, Tuva, Utah, Uzbekistan, Vermont, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin, Wyoming, Yugoslavia
8-12 weeks before last frost
2-4 weeks before last frost
3 to 7 years
https://powo.science.kew.org/taxon/urn:lsid:ipni.org:names:278747-1
Horseradish (Armoracia rusticana) is a perennial plant native to southeastern Europe and western Asia. It is a member of the Brassicaceae family, which includes other plants such as mustard and cabbage. The plant has large, dark green leaves and a white, elongated root. It grows to about 1-1.5 meters tall and has small white flowers that bloom in the spring. Horseradish is often grown for its large, white, pungent root, which is used as a condiment. The root can grow quite large and can be up to 1.5 meters in length. It is typically harvested in the fall, after the plant has been growing for at least two years. Horseradish prefers well-draining soil and full sun, and can be grown successfully in a wide range of climates. To cultivate horseradish, a grower can plant the root in the spring and keep the soil consistently moist. Once the plant is established, it can be harvested by carefully digging up the root and removing the leaves. The root of the horseradish plant is edible and is typically grated and used as a condiment. It has a strong, pungent flavor that is often used to add a spicy kick to dishes. The root can be stored in the refrigerator for several weeks, or it can be preserved by pickling or canning. Horseradish has a number of uses beyond its use as a condiment. It is sometimes used medicinally to treat respiratory conditions, and the leaves can be used as a natural insect repellent. The plant can also be used as a natural fertilizer or as a natural deterrent to pests. It is not known to be particularly valuable to wildlife. ## Propagation While it is possible to grow from seed, the way more easy method is division. Divison can be done all year but best in spring. Show

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Tomato Tomato
10-12
Annual, Perennial
Full sun
Moist
Light (sandy), Medium, Heavy (clay)
2.0
True
Fruit, Seed
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tomato
Fast
Garden tomato, Dumádu, Garden tomato, Love apple, Lycopersicum esculentum, Tomate, Tomato, Tomato extract containing lycopene, Tomato|thakkali, Tumatis, Lycopersicon esculentum
Solanaceae
Tomate
Oil
https://pfaf.org/User/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Solanum lycopersicum, https://pfaf.org/User/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Lycopersicon esculentum
Start seeds indoors 5-6 weeks before last frost
In containers or in rows in beds around last frost date
6.2-6.8
70-80°f
Peru
Alabama, Alaska, Andaman Is., Angola, Arizona, Arkansas, Assam, Austria, Azores, Bahamas, Bangladesh, Belarus, Benin, Bolivia, British Columbia, Bulgaria, Burkina, California, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canary Is., Cape Verde, Caroline Is., Central African Repu, Chagos Archipelago, Chatham Is., Christmas I., Colombia, Comoros, Connecticut, Cook Is., Costa Rica, Cuba, Cyprus, Czechoslovakia, Delaware, Dominican Republic, East Aegean Is., East European Russia, East Himalaya, Ecuador, Fiji, Florida, Galápagos, Georgia, Gilbert Is., Gulf of Guinea Is., Haiti, Hawaii, Illinois, India, Indiana, Iowa, Ivory Coast, Jawa, Kansas, Kazakhstan, Kentucky, Korea, Laccadive Is., Laos, Leeward Is., Line Is., Louisiana, Madagascar, Madeira, Maine, Malawi, Mali, Marianas, Marquesas, Marshall Is., Maryland, Massachusetts, Mauritania, Mauritius, Michigan, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nansei-shoto, Nauru, Nebraska, Nepal, Nevada, New Brunswick, New Caledonia, New Hampshire, New York, New Zealand North, Nicaragua, Nicobar Is., Niue, North Carolina, North Dakota, Nova Scotia, Ogasawara-shoto, Ohio, Ontario, Oregon, Pakistan, Panamá, Pennsylvania, Philippines, Pitcairn Is., Puerto Rico, Québec, Rhode I., Réunion, Saskatchewan, Selvagens, Society Is., South Carolina, South European Russi, Tadzhikistan, Taiwan, Tennessee, Texas, Trinidad-Tobago, Tuamotu, Tubuai Is., Turkey, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Utah, Uzbekistan, Venezuela, Vermont, Vietnam, Virginia, Wake I., Wisconsin, Zambia, Zaïre, Zimbabwe
1.00
https://powo.science.kew.org/taxon/urn:lsid:ipni.org:names:316947-2
The tomato is a flowering plant native to South America. It is a member of the nightshade family and closely related to the potato. The tomato plant typically grows to a height of 1-3 meters and has a weak, hairy stem. The leaves are arranged alternately on the stem and are typically dark green in color. The plant produces small yellow or white flowers, which develop into the fruit we know as tomatoes. The fruit itself is typically red, but can also be yellow, orange, green, or purple. Indeterminate tomato plants are perennials in their native habitat, but are cultivated as annuals. Determinate, or bush, plants are annuals that stop growing at a certain height and produce a crop all at once. Tomatoes prefer warm, sunny growing conditions and well-drained, humus-rich soil. They can be grown in a variety of soil types, but perform best in soil with a pH between 6 and 6.8. In order to cultivate tomatoes successfully, growers may need to provide support for the plant (such as a stake or cage) to prevent the fruit from weighing down the stem, and may also need to water and fertilize the plant regularly. Tomatoes are generally considered to be frost-sensitive, so in areas with cold winters they may need to be grown in a greenhouse or indoors. There are a great number of cultivars. The edible parts of the tomato plant are the fruit and the leaves. The fruit can be eaten raw or cooked, and is commonly used in a variety of dishes, such as salads, sandwiches, and pasta. The leaves, although not commonly eaten, are also edible and have a slightly bitter taste. After harvest, tomatoes can be stored at room temperature, in a cool place, or in the refrigerator. Show

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Black walnut Black walnut
4-9
Perennial
Full sun
Moist
Light (sandy), Medium, Heavy (clay)
30.0
Tall trees
Animal feed, Wind breaker, Wood, Wildlife habitat
true
Sap, Seed
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Juglans_nigra
Fast
Juglandaceae
Schwarznuss
true
Oil
https://pfaf.org/User/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Juglans nigra
Alabama, Arkansas, Connecticut, Delaware, District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Nebraska, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, Ontario, Pennsylvania, Rhode I., South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, West Virginia, Wisconsin
Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Czechoslovakia, Denmark, Germany, Hungary, Italy, New Mexico, North Caucasus, Poland, Romania, Tadzhikistan, Transcaucasus, Vermont, West Himalaya
https://powo.science.kew.org/taxon/urn:lsid:ipni.org:names:279034-2
Black walnut is a large deciduous tree native to North America, growing up to 100 feet tall. It has a straight trunk with a rough, deeply furrowed bark, and a canopy of large, pinnately compound leaves with 15-23 lance-shaped leaflets. The tree produces large, greenish-white flowers in the spring, followed by large, spherical fruits containing a single, edible nut. Black walnuts are prized for their distinctive, rich flavor and are commonly used in baking and cooking. The nuts can be harvested in the fall and can be stored in their shells for several months. Black walnuts prefer deep, well-drained soils and can tolerate a wide range of soil pH levels. They can be grown successfully in full sun to partial shade, and they are relatively drought-tolerant once established. Black walnuts are not particularly winter hardy, and they can be damaged by heavy ice and snow. In addition to their culinary uses, black walnuts have a number of other uses. The wood is highly prized for its durability and attractive grain, and is used in furniture making and other woodworking applications. The tree's leaves, bark, and nuts are also used in herbal medicine for their astringent and tonic properties. Black walnuts are also valued for their ability to improve soil health, as their deep taproots help to break up compacted soils and their fallen leaves add organic matter to the soil. Black walnuts are also an important food source for wildlife, including squirrels, birds, and deer. The tree provides shelter and nesting sites for a variety of animals, and its fallen leaves and nuts provide food for many species. Show

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